The World Meteorological Organisation has revealed the deadliest weather events to have hit the planet.

Away from the arc lights that accompany China's OBOR project, India has been quietly working on creating connectivity grids in its neighborhood and moving beyond physical connectivity to energy as

South Asia is home to nearly a quarter of the world’s population and is a region of dynamic economic growth, yet it performs relatively poorly on health and nutrition indicators.

Rotavirus vaccines are now globally recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), but in early 2009 WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization reviewed available data and concluded that there was no evidence for the efficacy or effectiveness of a two-dose schedule of the human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix) given early at 6 and 10 wk of age. Additionally, the effectiveness of programmatic rotavirus vaccination, including possible indirect effects, has not been assessed in low-resource populations in Asia.

South Asia despite decreasing rates of infectious disease, accounts for a significant proportion of their global burden. The sub-continent is also in the midst of rapid economic growth; large scale changes in land use, access to water and sanitation, and agricultural production; environmental degradation; and technological transformation, all against a background of uneven health system capacity. South Asia, defined by the World Bank as Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, is home to a quarter of the world’s population.

It is widely acknowledged that unmitigated risks provide a disincentive for otherwise optimal investments in modern farm inputs. Index insurance provides a means for managing risk without the burdens of asymmetric information and high transaction costs that plague traditional indemnity-based crop insurance programs.

How is it possible that lychee, a deliciously sweet tropical fruit, could induce a fatal hypoglycemic encephalopathy in children? The answer is straightforward: the edible fruit (aril) of lychee or litchi (Litchi sinensis or Litchi chinensis), and other members of the Soapberry family (Sapindaceae), contains unusual amino acids that disrupt gluconeogenesis and β-oxidation of fatty acids. (Comment)

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This article explores how microfinance institutions are affected by and are responding to flooding by examining a case study in Satkhira District, Southwest Bangladesh.

With the rapid ratification of the Paris Agreement, international climate funds will be important in scaling up developing countries climate action.

Bangladesh has always been prone to natural hazards such as cyclones and floods. Impacts of climate change have only increased the frequency and intensity of these extreme events, accompanied by rising sea levels.

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