South Asia is highly vulnerable to climate change. Given that many of the poor live in areas prone to climactic shifts and in occupations that are highly climate-sensitive, such as agriculture and fisheries, future climate change could have significant implications for living standards.

Pollution can permanently damage children’s lungs, along with affecting the brain and lowering intelligence, said this report released by UNICEF. This report which states that children’s IQ and memory is affected by pollution, sampled 17 million babies worldwide. The report further stated that globally 17 million babies live in highly polluted areas and South Asia is home to 12.2 million of them.

A critical question for agricultural production and food security is how water demand for staple crops will respond to climate and carbon dioxide (CO2) changes, especially in light of the expected increases in extreme heat exposure. To quantify the trade-offs between the effects of climate and CO2 on water demand, we use a ‘sink-strength’ model of demand which relies on the vapour-pressure deficit (VPD), incident radiation and the efficiencies of canopy-radiation use and canopy transpiration; the latter two are both dependent on CO2.

Diabetes and high body-mass index (BMI) are associated with increased risk of several cancers, and are increasing in prevalence in most countries. Researchers estimated the cancer incidence attributable to diabetes and high BMI as individual risk factors and in combination, by country and sex.

Original Source

Given that smallholder farmers are frequently food insecure and rely significantly on rain-fed agriculture, it is critical to examine climate variability and food insecurity. We utilize data from smallholder farmer surveys from 12 countries with 30 years of rainfall data to examine how rainfall variability and household resources are correlated with food security.

Air pollution exposure is the second most important risk factor for ill health in South Asia, contributing to between 13% and 21.7% of all deaths and approximately 58 million disability adjusted life years (DALYs) through chronic and acute respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses.1 Of the top 30 cities in the world with the poorest air quality in 2016, 17 are in South Asia.2 The impact of air pollution transcends boundaries. The “brown cloud”—caused by pollution from carbon aerosols—is a phenomenon captured in satellite images of atmospheric haze over South Asia, as well as China.

This report focuses on what is now the single biggest cause of child deaths through infectious disease. Pneumonia is a disease of poverty. Fatalities are concentrated in the world’s poorest countries. Within those countries it is the poorest and most disadvantaged children who face the greatest risks.

Mismanagement of waste and wastewater is a key reason behind the continuing environmental pollution and degrading livelihoods across the developing countries of South Asia such as Sri Lanka.

The researchers aimed to provide the first comprehensive estimates of the burden of group B Streptococcus (GBS), including invasive disease in pregnant and postpartum women, fetal infection/stillbirth, and infants. Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis is the current mainstay of prevention, reducing early-onset infant disease in high-income contexts. Maternal GBS vaccines are in development.

Original Source

Floods in Cambodia in 2011 and 2013 killed more than 400 people, displaced tens of thousands, and destroyed crops, livestock and homes.

Pages