This publication studies the potential impact of climate change on Sri Lanka’s vulnerable mountain ecosystem in order to help guide sustainable adaptation strategies.

The Bay of Bengal (BoB) region is emerging as an important focal point for climate security risks. This is largely due to a multi-layered interplay of geopolitical, geostrategic, and climate-related regional dynamics. It forms the final leg between West and East Asia. The region is one of the most climate-vulnerable in the world.

This paper assesses how the Huruluwewa tank (HWT) irrigation system in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka adapts to climate variability. The lessons learned in the HWT will be helpful for many water-scarce irrigation systems in the country, which bear high climate risks.

The purpose of this study was to review selected National Adaptation Plans (NAPs)/Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and contributing documents to better understand how disaster risk management is approached in climate change documents, and if systemic risk issues where impacts cascade across sectors are considered.

This research conducted by SLYCAN Trust aims to identify key indicators to assess and track the resilience of farming households as well as the impact of risk management, risk transfer, and risk finance interventions.

This report presents findings of a national-level, government-led analysis of interactions among targets that are part of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for Sri Lanka. The report was undertaken to support more coherent implementation of the country’s sustainable development agenda.

This paper assesses the socioeconomic impacts of Covid-19 in three South Asian economies -- Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka -- and corresponding fiscal policy responses to mitigate these impacts. Further, it appraises the sufficiency of these fiscal policy responses to support the economic recovery in respective economies.

This study provides an analysis of the linkages between multi-hazard exposure, lack of resilience, resulting disaster risk with related loss and damage, sovereign debt risks, and the lack of investment into resilience building. The COVID-19 pandemic has come on top of the climate crisis, the existential threat of our time.

This report presents the challenges faced and opportunities revealed through a study of two cases of source-segregated waste collection by local authorities in Sri Lanka; Moratuwa Municipal Council, in Colombo, and Kataragama Pradeshiya Sabha, in Monaragala for the purpose of raising planning and decision making capacities not only in Sri Lanka

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management, particularly final disposal as open dumps has become a global issue. Worldwide, dumpsites are the third largest anthropogenic source of methane, accounting for 11 percent of estimated global methane emissions or 881 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent.

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