One of Nigeria’s largest hydro dams lays waste as turbines bought in 1982 from a German company were abandoned at the dam site and are now obsolete.

FOWIND, the consortium led by the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), published a study providing an informed outlook for offshore wind development in the Indian states of Gujarat and Tamil Nadu.

Despite significant economic growth in Asia in recent decades, millions of people in rural Asia still lack access to electricity. In response, the Asian Development Bank is working to foster universal access to energy by developing small hybrid renewable energy systems in rural Asian areas.

The FOWIND Consortium launched a new report: “Grid Integration Study for Offshore Wind Farm Development in Gujarat and Tamil Nadu”. This DNV-GL led study is a significant step forward in preparing a roadmap for the offshore wind sector in India by the GWEC led FOWIND consortium.

Indian Wind Energy – A Brief Outlook is a joint publication by GWEC and IWTMA. The report examines the current status of wind power development in India, assesses the potential for future growth, and highlights the socio-economic, environmental and energy security benefits.

GWEC launched its Global Wind Market Report on the state of the global wind industry on 25 April 2017 at Windergy in Delhi. This flagship publication is the industry’s premiere global report and most widely used source of data. The report provides a comprehensive snapshot of the global wind industry now present in more than 90 countries.

The decarbonisation of energy sources requires additional investments in renewable technologies, including the installation of onshore and offshore wind farms. For wind energy to remain competitive, wind farms must continue to provide low-cost power even when covering larger areas. Inside very large wind farms, winds can decrease considerably from their free-stream values to a point where an equilibrium wind speed is reached.

Europe installed 12.5 GW of gross additional wind capacity in 2016. This was 3% less than the new installations in 2015. With a total installed capacity of 153.7 GW, wind energy now overtakes coal as the second largest form of power generation capacity in Europe. 2016 annual figures: 12.5 GW of new wind power capacity was installed and grid-connected in the EU during 2016, a decrease of 3% compared to 2015 annual installations. 10,923 MW were installed onshore, and 1,567 MW were installed offshore; Wind power installed more than any other form of power generation in Europe in 2016.

The Lake Turkana Wind Power Project (LTWP), currently under construction, will add 310 megawatts (MW) of wind power capacity to Kenya’s national grid.

The Ministry approved Wind Data Sharing Policy proposed by National Institute of Wind Energy. The Wind Power development programme in India was initiated at the end of Sixth Five Year Plan, in 1983-84. In order to identify wind farmable sites in the country, the Government of India launched a national wind resource assessment programme in 1985.

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