Electricity storage could be a crucial factor in the world’s transition to sustainable energy systems based on renewable sources. Yet electricity markets frequently fail to account properly for the system value of storage.

The growth in renewable energy jobs is the logical result of the increasing deployment of renewables – a development underpinned by falling costs and supportive policies. Renewables account for more than half of all capacity additions in the global power sector since 2011 and their share in total power generation has steadily increased.

As the renewable energy sector matures, policies must be adapted to reflect changing market conditions. With the increasing use of auctions, policymakers seek to procure renewables-based electricity at the lowest price and also fulfil socio-economic objectives.

Countries seeking to scale up renewables can draw on the bond market, including the growing range of securities dedicated to sustainable, environmentally beneficial, climate-safe project finance. Renewable energy has emerged as a major recipient of such green bond proceeds.

Investment in renewables must accelerate rapidly, with all available capital sources being activated to finance the transformation of the global energy system.

Many Arab countries, despite currently low to negligible renewable energy use, have set ambitious targets to increase their shares of renewables. Yet power-system planning is frequently constrained by cost implications and the lack of first-hand experience with renewables.

Sweden has set out to meet 100% of its electricity needs from renewable sources by 2040. With the essential infrastructure for a decarbonised power system in place, the country is well positioned to help the world meet the crucial climate goals.

Sweden has set out to meet 100% of its electricity needs from renewable sources by 2040. With the essential infrastructure for a decarbonised power system in place, the country is well positioned to help the world meet the crucial climate goals.

The world’s existing electricity systems were designed mainly for conventional, centralised power generation. Large plants have generated the bulk of electricity, frequently based on fossil fuels, and dispatched it to consumers based on relatively inflexible schedules.

Wind energy, like other parts of the global energy industry, remains largely male-dominated. Yet opportunities exist to improve the gender balance, make greater use of women’s skills, and entrench wind power as part of an inclusive and sustainable energy system for the future.

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