The Paris Agreement has called for reducing carbon emissions worldwide. But to sufficiently limit the rise in global temperatures, energy use would have to be completely decarbonised in less than 50 years, even amid the expected tripling of the world’s economy by 2060.

Sub-Saharan Africa possesses considerable resources to produce sustainable liquid biofuels, based on biomass feedstocks that would neither conflict with food supplies nor add to carbon dioxide emissions.

Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) are a cornerstone of the Paris Agreement on climate change. They set out the actions that countries plan to undertake to achieve the agreement’s objectives, focused on limiting the rise in average global temperatures to well below 2°C, ideally to 1.5 °C.

Like solar photovoltaic (PV) panels a decade earlier, battery electricity storage systems offer enormous deployment and cost-reduction potential, according to this study by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).

Consultations in the Philippines have called for “establishing an enabling environment for mini-grids” to expand energy access and increase national energy security based on renewable sources and technologies.

As solar photovoltaic (PV) power systems become increasingly competitive, continued market growth depends on assurances of performance and durability. Quality assurance protects and accelerates future PV investments, lowers capital costs, improves performance, extends module lifespans and lowers the resulting electricity costs.

Energy-related emissions represent two-thirds of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Immediate action is needed to start putting the world on a path to net-zero emissions, as per the Paris Agreement. Renewable energy and energy efficiency will work in synergy to drive global energy decarbonisation.

Assets like power plants can become “stranded” by unanticipated or premature write-downs, devaluation or conversion to liabilities. This will happen to some degree in the transition to a low-carbon economy.

The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) has set out to produce comprehensive, reliable data sets on renewable energy capacity and use worldwide. The Renewable Energy Statistics 2017 yearbook shows data sets on renewable power-generation capacity for 2007-2016, renewable power generation for 2007-2015 and renewable energy balances for about 100 countries and areas for 2014 and 2015. Further, it features statistics on investments in renewable energy from 18 major multi-lateral, bilateral and national development financial institutions, presented for the period 2009-2015.

Energy planners developing solar power and other renewable energy projects now have better access to free data and tools, with the rollout of IRENA’s Global Atlas 3.0.

Pages