Energy consumption in Southeast Asia has doubled in just over two decades. With annual economic growth exceeding 4%, the region can expect energy demand to rise further in the years ahead.

For more than two decades, the European Union (EU) has been at the forefront of global renewable energy deployment. This preview for policy makers outlines the EU’s potential to meet increasingly ambitious renewable energy targets.

This study analyses the prospective impact of renewable energy deployment, along with recently mandated changes to power plant cooling systems, on water use in India’s electricity sector.

Massive flows of finance are needed to accelerate renewable energy investments. More investment in renewables would reduce energy-related carbon emissions, a key element in efforts to limit global warming.

Renewable energy has emerged as an increasingly competitive way to meet new power generation needs.

Restoration of degraded land can create vast bioenergy crop potential, without constraining food crops or other land use options. This presents an important opportunity for African countries to develop modern, sustainable bioenergy from rapidly growing wood crops at the same time as pursuing ambitious forest landscape restoration initiatives.

For households without access to grid-based electricity or gas for cooking, traditional cook stoves are typically fuelled by wood or charcoal, generating considerable indoor air pollution. Cook stoves fuelled with biogas provide complete combustion, significantly alleviating health and environmental problems.

The Paris Agreement has called for reducing carbon emissions worldwide. But to sufficiently limit the rise in global temperatures, energy use would have to be completely decarbonised in less than 50 years, even amid the expected tripling of the world’s economy by 2060.

Sub-Saharan Africa possesses considerable resources to produce sustainable liquid biofuels, based on biomass feedstocks that would neither conflict with food supplies nor add to carbon dioxide emissions.

Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) are a cornerstone of the Paris Agreement on climate change. They set out the actions that countries plan to undertake to achieve the agreement’s objectives, focused on limiting the rise in average global temperatures to well below 2°C, ideally to 1.5 °C.

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