A renewables-based energy transition promises to deliver vast socio-economic benefits to countries across Africa, improving energy access, creating jobs and boosting energy security.

Most Small Island Developing States (SIDS) rely heavily on conventional fossil fuels for electricity generation and transport; however, renewables have the potential to deliver quick returns, decrease costs, create jobs and improve the local economy for many of these island states.

District heating systems have been built to run at high temperatures to meet the demands of poorly insulated buildings. In most cases, this necessitates the use of fossil fuels.

The National Energy Strategy 2020–2030 presents the evolution of the energy sector under its vision for stimulating demand, achieving efficiency and improving electricity system flexibility.

The International Renewable Energy Agency's (IRENA) transforming energy scenario identifies the course the world should pursue to create a sustainable future energy system. To achieve this goal, profound changes will be required to convert the present system from dependence on fossil fuels to greater reliance on renewable energy.

Methanol is essential for the chemical industry and represents an emerging fuel for a wide range of uses. Although largely produced from fossil fuels, it can also be made from sustainable, renewable-based energy sources.

Japan has long been a major energy importer, relying heavily on fossil fuels to meet household and community electricity needs as well as transport and industrial energy demand.

El Salvador has prioritised renewable energy projects to reduce its dependence on imported fossil fuels and improve energy security. The National Energy Policy 2010-2024 has become a key tool for the country to advance the use of indigenous renewables, including hydropower, biomass, solar photovoltaic (PV) and geothermal power.

As global economies aim to become carbon neutral, competitive hydrogen produced with renewables has emerged as a key component of the energy mix. Falling renewable power costs and improving electrolyser technologies could make "green" hydrogen cost competitive by 2030, this report finds.

With signing of the Paris Agreement, countries pledged to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to adapt to the impacts of climate change. By scaling up renewable energy, countries can sharply reduce one major source of the problem: energy-related CO2 emissions.

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