Demand for industrial products has risen considerably in the past two decades, along with energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Process heat in industry accounts for 29% of global final energy demand, and carbon dioxide emissions that are roughly equal in size to total emissions from the transportation sector.

Even as air pollution shaves years off life expectancy, fossil fuel projects get more funding than clean air initiatives, a global report said.

Energy protests are becoming increasingly common and significant around the world. While in the global North concerns tend to centre around climate issues, in the global South the concerns are more often with affordable energy. Both types of protests, however, have one issue in common: the undemocratic nature of energy policymaking.

For decades, the object of international climate governance has been greenhouse gases, standardised to tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent. The ongoing inadequacy of decarbonisation efforts based on this system has prompted calls to expand the scope of international climate governance to include restrictions on the supply of fossil fuels.

This briefing paper explains how policymakers can account for well-to-wake (WTW) carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions in strategies that aim to monitor or regulate climate-warming pollutants from ships. Well-to-wake emissions, or life-cycle emissions, are the sum of upstream (well-to-tank) and downstream (tank-to-wake) emissions.

Using a multi-method approach, this study focuses on the period between 2007 and 2017 to investigate the dynamics of fuel protest in Nigeria to ask how, and under which conditions, struggles over energy access in Nigeria produce accountability and empowerment.

Climate change policies including net-zero commitments, green new deals, and circular economy plans often combine carbon-reduction objectives with a set of policy and market interventions needed to reach those goals.

Despite the economic disruption from COVID-19, top global debt and equity investors are continuing to drive capital into the renewable energy infrastructure sector due to its consistency in providing investment opportunities, finds a new report from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).

This report models the climate change mitigation potential of fossil fuel subsidy reform across 32 countries. The results show how much greenhouse gas emissions - both in per cent as well as in absolute terms - countries can save by 2030.

When the IEA published its first Electricity Market Report in December 2020, large parts of the world were in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic and its resulting lockdowns. Half a year later, electricity demand around the world is rebounding or even exceeding pre-pandemic levels, especially in emerging and developing economies.

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