Engaging burgeoning youth populations in developing country agriculture is seen as an important strategy toward effective, efficient, and sustainable food system transformation.

The paper provides evidence on the evolving socioeconomic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic among households in Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, and Uganda. The data allow estimating the immediate economic impacts of the pandemic, beginning in April 2020, and tracking how the situation evolved through September 2020.

The brief leverages COVID-19 high frequency phone survey (HFPS) data collected primarily by National Statistics Offices (NSO) 2 of five SSA countries (Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, and Uganda), with support from the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) and the Poverty and Equity Global Practice teams.

Approximately 47 percent of Nigerian growers have no access to any kind of storage facilities during the harvest. This was disclosed in a report by SBM Intel, a geopolitical research and strategic communications consulting firm.

The working paper presents a framework for assessing country-specific needs, opportunities and priorities for improving measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of livestock greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and emission reductions. The framework consists of 13 guiding questions that are implemented in an eight-step assessment.

This report highlights how the COVID-19 (coronavirus) crisis has impacted Nigeria’s economy. In 2020, Nigeria’s economy is expected to experience its deepest recession since the 1980s due to the COVID-19-related disruptions, notably lower oil prices and remittances, enhanced risk aversion in global capital markets, and mobility restrictions.

The Government’s policy measures such as travel restrictions, lockdowns, and restrictions on economic and social activities, aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19, had affected the livelihoods and food security of smallholders in Nigeria.

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the attempts to limit its spread have resulted in profound economic impacts, and a significant contraction in the global economy is expected.

This report addresses the question of Nigeria's fragile coastal areas. Using a consistent valuation methodology, it estimates the cost of coastal degradation in three Nigerian states: Cross River, Delta and Lagos.

As this report is issued, more than 33 million people worldwide have been infected with COVID-19 and one million have died. Some 11.8 million cases and 409 thousand deaths have been confirmed in the 63 countries covered in the COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan (GHRP). However, the raw data should be treated with caution.

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