Traditionally, mini grids have been viewed as “off-grid” systems that are built and operated solely for communities without electricity.

The Government of Nigeria avoided a fiscal cliff by implementing bold reforms, including ending the gasoline (premium motor spirit, PMS) subsidy, and shifting to a unified, market-reflective foreign exchange (FX) rate. These essential reforms entail painful adjustments.

An estimated 3.6 billion people – almost half the global population – live without access to safely managed sanitation. These figures come with a devastating human cost: each day, around 1000 children under 5 years of age die from diarrheal diseases attributed directly or indirectly to unsafe water, sanitation and hand hygiene.

The new administration has initiated critical reforms to address macroeconomic imbalances. This window of opportunity could have a transformative impact on the lives of millions of Nigerians and establish a solid foundation for sustainable and inclusive growth.

Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world and now accounts for more than half of the fish consumed globally. However, the sector in Africa remains in its infancy, with the notable exception of Egypt, one of the world’s largest producers.

This report provides results of the analysis of the Sierra Leone mini-grid tariff cost buildup and practical recommendations for interventions to reduce end-user tariffs and improve the affordability of mini-grid electrification in rural areas.

This report summarizes the evidence-based and costed country roadmaps for effective public interventions to transform agriculture and food systems in Ethiopia, Malawi, and Nigeria in a way that ends hunger, makes diets healthier and more affordable, improves the productivity and incomes of small-scale producers and their households, and mitigate

This Renewable Energy Roadmap for Nigeria was developed in collaboration with the Energy Commission of Nigeria and analyses the additional renewable energy deployment potential up to the year 2050, with an additional 2030 focus to aid shorter-term policy development.

Nigeria’s economy needs to grow faster to reduce poverty. Despite favorable global oil prices, “business as usual” economic management is not delivering desired outcomes and, even if a crisis is avoided in the near-term, long-standing policy and institutional challenges are persisting and severely constraining the economy.

Sustainable intensification is predicated on climate-smart agricultural input adoption. Test strategies for promoting the adoption of climate-smart agricultural inputs in Nigeria with a private sector firm.

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