Child poverty is expected to remain above pre-COVID levels for at least five years in high-income countries.

At the height of nationwide lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, up to 1.6 billion children were affected by school closures, causing the largest mass disruption of education in modern history.

UNICEF warned in a new report of significant and growing consequences for children as the COVID-19 pandemic lurches toward a second year. Released ahead of World Children’s Day, Averting a Lost COVID Generation is the first UNICEF report to comprehensively outline the dire and growing consequences for children as the pandemic drags on.

COVID-19-related health service disruptions could worsen the situation, potentially adding nearly 200,000 more stillbirths over a 12-month period warn the estimates released by UNICEF, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Bank Group and the Population Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

This document is a supplement to the Framework for reopening schools, originally published by UNICEF, UNESCO, World Bank, WFP, and UNHCR and provides practical guidance on how to reopen schools. As more countries move in that direction, lessons are beginning to emerge on what is working.

Protect the Progress: Rise, Refocus, Recover, 2020 highlights that since the Every Woman Every Child movement was launched 10 years ago, spearheaded by the United Nations Secretary-General, there has been remarkable progress in improving the health of the world’s women, children and adolescents.

New analysis reveals the number of children living in multidimensional poverty – without access to education, health, housing, nutrition, sanitation, or water – has increased by 15 per cent since the start of the pandemic.

Countries around the world are taking broad public health and social measures (PHSM), including closure of schools, to prevent the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19.1 This Annex examines considerations for school operations, including openings, closures and re-openings and the measures needed to minimize the risk to students

Since the beginning of the lockdowns and quarantine restrictions enacted by Governments to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is witnessing a horrifying surge - a surge of what was already an epidemic - in gender-based violence (GBV), particularly intimate partner violence.

With the number of under-five deaths at an all-time recorded low of 5.2 million in 2019, disruptions in child and maternal health services due to the COVID-19 pandemic are putting millions of additional lives at stake.

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