Tiny temperature rise can make mass deaths twice as likely; unchecked emissions can expose 3/4ths of humanity to deadly heatwaves.

Killer heat is getting worse, a new study shows.

Climate change can increase the risk of conditions that exceed human thermoregulatory capacity. Although numerous studies report increased mortality associated with extreme heat events, quantifying the global risk of heat-related mortality remains challenging due to a lack of comparable data on heat-related deaths. Here we conducted a global analysis of documented lethal heat events to identify the climatic conditions associated with human death and then quantified the current and projected occurrence of such deadly climatic conditions worldwide.

Rising global temperatures are causing increases in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events, such as floods, droughts, and heat waves. We analyze changes in summer temperatures, the frequency, severity, and duration of heat waves, and heat-related mortality in India between 1960 and 2009 using data from the India Meteorological Department. Mean temperatures across India have risen by more than 0.5°C over this period, with statistically significant increases in heat waves.

In April 2016, southeast Asia experienced surface air temperatures (SATs) that surpassed national records, exacerbated energy consumption, disrupted agriculture and caused severe human discomfort. Here we show using observations and an ensemble of global warming simulations the combined impact of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and long-term warming on regional SAT extremes. We find a robust relationship between ENSO and southeast Asian SATs wherein virtually all April extremes occur during El Niño years.

The soaring mercury level has pushed Delhi's power demand to an all-time high.

Heat waves and drought are often considered the most damaging climatic stressors for wheat. In this study, we characterize and attribute the effects of these climate extremes on wheat yield anomalies (at global and national scales) from 1980 to 2010. Using a combination of up-to-date heat wave and drought indexes (the latter capturing both excessively dry and wet conditions), we have developed a composite indicator that is able to capture the spatio-temporal characteristics of the underlying physical processes in the different agro-climatic regions of the world.

Hot loo winds sweeping in from Rajasthan scorched Delhi-NCR on Sunday , sending the mercury shooting up to a blistering 47 degrees Celsius at Palam.

Delhi has witnessed significant ozone build-up this summer, adding to the public health risk -- shows a latest analysis done by Centre for Science and Environment (CSE). Building up to the World Environment Day, CSE has analysed the real-time air quality data available from the key monitoring locations of Delhi Pollution Control Committee for the summer months of 2016 and 2017. This shows ozone pollution in the city is worsening progressively with the onset of summer.

The mercury levels continued to soar above 42 degree celsius in majority of places in the state on Wednesday.

Pages