Water-related hazards like floods and droughts are increasing because of climate change. The number of people suffering water stress is expected to soar, exacerbated by population increase and dwindling availability.

If the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are to be achieved by the 2030 target, the risks posed by human-induced climate change must be understood and addressed. The World Meteorological Organization has published a new report on Climate Indicators and Sustainable Development: Demonstrating the Interconnections.

COVID-19 did not slow the relentless advance of climate change. There is no sign that we are growing back greener, as carbon dioxide emissions are rapidly recovering after a temporary blip due to the economic slowdown and are nowhere close to reduction targets.

COVID-19 lockdowns brought rapid and “unprecedented” improvements in air quality in some parts of the world - but not enough to halt climate change caused by global warming said the World Meteorological Organization (WMO)'s Air Quality and Climate Bulletin

A disaster related to a weather, climate or water hazard occurred every day on average over the past 50 years – killing 115 people and causing US$ 202 million in losses daily, according to this new report from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Climate change and extreme weather are threatening human health and safety, food, water and energy security and the environment in Latin America and the Caribbean. The impacts span the entire region, including Andean peaks, mighty river basins and low-lying islands, according to a new report from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

An estimated 23,000 lives per year could be saved potential annual benefits of at least US$ 162 billion could be realized by improving weather forecasts, early warning systems, and climate information – known as hydromet, according to a new report.

Odds are increasing that the annual average global temperature will rise beyond 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, in at least one of the next five years, the UN weather agency warns in a new report.

Irrespective of the widespread surmise that the pandemic-induced lockdowns and shutdowns would lead to less emissions thus reduced impact on the climate, this report released by the World Meteorological Organisation reveals that the global climate crisis worsened

A new World Meteorological Organization bulletin on Aerosols examines the impact of biomass burning (wildfires and open burning for agriculture) on climate and air quality. It covers the episodes of the 2019/2020 Australian bushfires, the 2015 Indonesia peatfires and smoke transport from boreal forest fires to the Arctic.

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