India needs a whopping USD 2.64 trillion investment to meet the UN's sustainable development goals (SDGs), offering the private sector an investment opportunity of over USD 1.12 trillion by 2030, according to a report.

Given the growing international pressure to mitigate climate change and increasing fears around climate impacts, expectations of continued investment in fossil fuels in Southeast Asia’s power sector appear puzzling.

China, Japan and Korea have deployed a multiplicity of co-operation efforts at different levels of government to promote air quality and curb transboundary pollution.

The Abu Dhabi Fund for Development (ADFD) finances innovative projects to expand sustainable energy access as part of a joint initiative with the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).

Escalating environmental degradation and the risk of climate change are attracting growing attention from both policy makers and the public. For Asian countries, decades of remarkable economic growth have had mixed results in terms of environmental implications.

This report discusses the impacts of transport projects on wildlife and biodiversity in Asia, and how to address them by integrating road ecology principles and green infrastructure to balance construction with environmental conservation.

The Review of Sustainable Transport Connectivity in Asia and the Pacific: Addressing the Challenges for Freight Transport is the biennial publication of Transport Division. The edition of 2019 is produced at the three-year mark of the five-year Regional Action Programme for Sustainable Transport Connectivity in Asia and the Pacific (2017-2021).

Hunger in Europe and Central Asia is low, but a high number of people are affected by moderate food insecurity, such as limited food and access to nutritious food, as well as overweight and obesity, revealed a new FAO report.

Malnutrition has historically been researched and addressed within two distinct silos, focusing either on undernutrition, food insecurity, and micronutrient deficiencies, or on overweight, obesity, and dietary excess. However, through rapid global nutrition transition, an increasing proportion of individuals are exposed to different forms of malnutrition during the life course and have the double burden of malnutrition (DBM) directly.

The double burden of malnutrition (DBM), defined as the simultaneous manifestation of both undernutrition and overweight and obesity, affects most low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). This Series paper describes the dynamics of the DBM in LMICs and how it differs by socioeconomic level. This Series paper shows that the DBM has increased in the poorest LMICs, mainly due to overweight and obesity increases.

Note: Double Burden of Malnutrition 1 (Series)

Pages