India's urban population is estimated to stand at 675 million in 2035, the second highest behind China's one billion, the UN said in this report, noting that after the COVID-19 pandemic, the global urban population is back on track to grow by another 2.2 billion by 2050.

The populations of African cities are expected to grow by more than 900 million by 2050. Many of these people will live in secondary cities. These cities are a sub‑set of cities within national systems of cities.

Order of the National Green Tribunal in the matter of Yogendra Mohan Sengupta Vs Union of India & Others dated 12/05/2022.

Challenge in the application is to the Draft Development Plan, 2041 prepared by the Town and Country Planning Department, Himachal Pradesh on the ground that such a plan is contrary to the sustainable development principle and destructive of environment and public safety.

Order of the National Green Tribunal in the matter of Raghu Ramakrishna Vs State of Andhra Pradesh dated 06/05/2022.

Grievance in the application is against violation of environmental norms in the course of construction work over the Rushikonda Hill near Visakhapatnam, in violation of the Master Plan notified by the Urban Development Department under the AP Urban Development Areas (Development) Act of 1975.

SA Cities Network’s (SACN) latest State of Cities report strongly points to the need for a “whole-of-government and all-of-society approach” to address rampant urban governance issues. The report is a five-year analysis of nine key cities and their performance, and includes trends, insights, inclusivity, productivity and governance.

Submission by applicants Manorama Sharma and Sandeep Sachin in a case filed before the National Green Tribunal against TDI Infrastructure Limited.

The Government of Telangana publishes the Socio Economic Outlook (SEO) annually and tables it in the State Legislature during the budget session. It presents the socio-economic performance of the State across various sectors and recognises the specific gaps and challenges to initiate appropriate action.

Institutional weaknesses limit the capacity of local governments to support efficient urbanization in developing countries. They also lead to the emergence of large developers with the clout to build entire cities. This paper analyzes the urbanization process when local governments are weak and large developers are powerful.

Cities are the engine of the global economy - contributing 80% of the world’s GDP – but their exponential growth in recent decades has come at the expense of nature. The built environment has grown by two-thirds in the first 12 years of the 21st century, leading to the degradation of local ecosystems and the loss of habitats.

In an already urbanized world, an increasing concentration of people, development assets, infrastructure, socio-economic vulnerabilities and convergence of risks of multiple hues in cities and urban agglomerations underscores the need for an integrated approach towards resilience building.

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