This paper provides a method for understanding how city actions impact trees and forests outside their boundaries. The Forest Footprint for Cities methodology connects global estimates of tropical and subtropical deforestation linked to agricultural production to commodity-specific international trade and city consumption.

Smart city policy goals are becoming mainstream in South East Asia but lack a supply of innovative smart city business models, products and services. ESCAP is joining the movement to support the acceleration of smart innovative solutions for cities through its Smart Cities Innovation Lab project.

Rapidly expanding cities in very dry parts of the world must be turned into "green urban oases" to ensure they become both healthier places to live in and more resilient to climate change, according to this new report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

This paper discusses impacts of urbanization on natural infrastructure in India’s 10 most populated. Urbanization today is disconnected from the natural environment causing negative outcomes, such as water scarcity, increased groundwater stress, and urban flooding.

The ASEAN Sustainable Urbanisation Report aims to capture the diversity of urban contexts across ASEAN Member States, in particular the increasing importance of secondary cities and the need to fully harness their potential.

Better Forests, Better Cities evaluates how forests both inside and outside city boundaries benefit cities and their residents, and what actions cities can take to conserve, restore and sustainably manage those forests.

The consequences of climate change in developing countries are worsening fast: many ecosystems will shortly reach points of irreversible damage, and socio-economic costs will continue to rise. To alleviate the future impacts on populations and economies, policy makers are looking for the spaces where they can make the greatest difference.

This compendium provides concrete examples of Nature-based Solutions (NbS) implemented in urban areas in India, Bangladesh and Nepal. 15 detailed case studies have been documented to assist governments at all levels as well as practitioners, NGOs, civil society and academics to plan, implement, replicate and scale NbS.

A new World Bank report estimates that India will need to invest $840 billion over the next 15 years—or an average of $55 billion per annum—into urban infrastructure if it is to effectively meet the needs of its fast-growing urban population.

Cities are at the forefront of the climate crisis. Climate risks are escalating, and climate hazards are becoming more frequent and costly. Cities account for more than 80% of the global GDP and more than half of the world’s population.

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