This publication examines opportunities for pursuing pro-poor urban resilience initiatives to reduce the increasing impacts of heat stress faced by urban populations in Asia and the Pacific. Cities in the region are increasingly at risk of heat waves, which are expected to be more severe and persistent due to global warming.

Urbanization and regional trade integration are dual megatrends, and each is likely to have a powerful impact on African economies and broader economic development throughout the region.

Global poverty monitored by the World Bank for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is reported only at the national level, lacking a breakdown between urban and rural areas. A key challenge to producing globally comparable estimates of urban poverty is the need for consistent definitions of urban areas and poverty.

This report highlights the scope and functions of a dozen tree laws implemented in different states in India. The implementation of these laws has come to public focus in recent years due to the growing number of cases of large-scale tree felling in Indian cities.

India's urban population is estimated to stand at 675 million in 2035, the second highest behind China's one billion, the UN said in this report, noting that after the COVID-19 pandemic, the global urban population is back on track to grow by another 2.2 billion by 2050.

Investment in urban climate projects is urgently needed worldwide. Cities hold most of the global population and economic activity and contribute approximately three-quarters of the global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, underlining the urgent need for projects to reduce emissions in urban areas and increase climate resilience.

Air pollution is a complex and multifaceted issue. Cleaning up our air can be a secret weapon in addressing some of society’s biggest challenges together, from public health to climate change, children’s development and sustainable economic growth.

Greenpeace India’s latest report follows the heatwave trends in 10 Indian capital cities: New Delhi, Jaipur, Lucknow, Shimla, Bhopal, Patna, Mumbai, Kolkata, Hyderabad and Chennai. India ranks 5th in terms of people exposed to heatwaves.

This book examines the transition to sustainable energy systems in emerging cities. Experts from around the world present case studies from different countries and discuss efforts were needed for achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The authors look into the issue of environment vs.

How can cities promote resilient, low-carbon and just urbanisation, in a context of increasing climate breakdown and inequality?. IIED’s urban researchers set out a vision for urban transformation to build just and inclusive cities.

Pages