Economic growth and rising per capita incomes have all but wiped out hunger in Europe and Central Asia. But as countries become more affluent, changing consumption patterns are giving rise to other health threats. This "food insecurity transition" is documented in a new report released by FAO.

Future extreme sea levels (ESLs) and flood risk along European coasts will be strongly impacted by global warming. Yet, comprehensive projections of ESL that include mean sea level (MSL), tides, waves, and storm surges do not exist. Here, we show changes in all components of ESLs until 2100 in view of climate change. We find that by the end of this century, the 100-year ESL along Europe's coastlines is on average projected to increase by 57 cm for Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP)4.5 and 81 cm for RCP8.5.

This report summarises the topline findings of the European Perception of Climate Change Project (EPCC), a study that gives insights into public perceptions of climate change across four major European countries – France, Germany, Norway and the United Kingdom.

From East to West, the economies of Europe and Central Asia (ECA) are not taking full advantage of the internet to foster economic growth and job creation. The residents of Central Asia and the South Caucasus pay some of the highest prices in the world for internet connections that are slow and unreliable.

This assessment identifies and analyzes major cities around the world that have the highest high electric vehicle uptake by new vehicle share and sales in 2015.

Urban noise pollution and hearing loss are closely linked, according to rankings of 50 large cities in both categories released on Friday.

Municipalities across Europe increasingly acknowledge the need to adapt to climate change and have begun to adopt various measures. Meeting the costs of adaptation measures for climate change is, however, a major challenge. Municipalities have found innovative ways to overcome that challenge and have started implementing measures.

Study claims 50 percent chance of major chill before end of the century.

The trace element selenium is essential for human health and is required in a narrow dietary concentration range. Insufficient selenium intake has been estimated to affect up to 1 billion people worldwide. Dietary selenium availability is controlled by soil–plant interactions, but the mechanisms governing its broad-scale soil distributions are largely unknown. Using data-mining techniques, we modeled recent (1980–1999) distributions and identified climate–soil interactions as main controlling factors.

• VW's top UK executive, Paul Willis, has said that of the 1.2 million cars in the UK affected by the diesel emissions scandal, 470,000 have been fixed.

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