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An upcoming review of the heavy-duty CO2 emissions standards in the European Union will consider several adjustments to the regulation, including the possibility of extending the CO2 emissions reduction targets to other vehicle segments, as well as setting specific targets for trailers.

The European Commission recently released a number of policy proposals in its “Fit for 55” package, aimed at achieving the European Union’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 55% in 2030 compared to 1990 levels. This policy update focuses on the elements of this package related to the promotion of alternative fuels.

This briefing provides policy recommendations to assist European Council and Parliament as they negotiate the final legislation for the Fit for 55 package. The recommendations follow the findings in a previous ICCT paper regarding how changes to the policy proposals can achieve greater greenhouse gas (GHG) savings at a lower cost.

This report provides a factual analysis of the environmental pressures exerted by the maritime transport sector, presents up-to-date information on the relevant EU and international environmental standards and describes current and future actions to reduce the sector's impact on our environment.

The extraction and processing of raw materials are associated with potentially significant environmental impacts, including contributing to approximately half of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally.

Long-haul trucks are responsible for the bulk of road freight CO2 emissions in Europe. However, at the time the heavy-duty vehicle CO2 standards were finalized in the European Union in 2019, there was little information available on zero-emission technologies.

This document is the annual EU emission inventory report under the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (Air Convention) (UNECE, 1979).

EU member states must ensure careful and efficient implementation of economic recovery plans that support inclusion and growth to bounce back from the worst impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, says a new World Bank report.

As part of a plan to decarbonize its economy by 2050, the European Union is considering the introduction of a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM), to reduce the risk of carbon leakage and to level the field for European industries working towards decarbonization of their production processes.

The Oeko Institute along with T&E has published a report on the integration of maritime transport in the EU emissions trading system (ETS).

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