This WWF briefing describes how climate change is impacting fisheries and food security, and highlights the European Union’s role in mitigating these impacts both for EU citizens and for developing countries.

The coastal and sub-montane forest of Eastern Africa is ranked as one of the world's most endangered biodiversity hotspots. The East Usambara landscape represents one of the larger forest blocks within this hotspot, and contains species such as the critically-endangered long-billed tailorbird and the endangered Usambara weaver.

Several multilateral development banks use shadow carbon pricing to help decide which transactions to make. This briefing considers some best practices and limitations in the application of shadow carbon prices.

In September 2015, the Member States of the United Nations agreed the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs are 17 goals and 169 targets, which aim to achieve sustainable development in a balanced and integrated manner. Most of the 169 targets have a deadline of 2030.

South Africa faces an impending food security crisis if there isn't urgent action to correct unsustainable practices, says an environmental organisation. According to the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), South Africa will have to produce 50% more food by 2050 to feed an estimated population of 73 million people.

The Living Planet Report, WWF’s flagship publication released every two years, is a comprehensive study of trends in global biodiversity and the health of the planet.

Nepal made headway in the fight against poaching and illegal wildlife trade with the achievement of 365 days of zero poaching of rhinos for the first time in 2011. Till 2018, Nepal was successful in celebrating zero poaching year of rhinos on five occasions.

Healthy freshwater ecosystems are essential for nature, for society and for economies. Yet not even half the waters in the EU are currently considered healthy.

Healthy freshwater ecosystems are essential for nature, for society and for economies. Yet not even half the waters in the EU are currently considered healthy.

WWF has published a report that highlights the capacity of healthy rivers to help mitigate natural disasters, among other less valued benefits. The publication provides a framework for improving how societies measure, value, and promote rivers’ diverse benefits. It also offers solutions to support better decisions and management.

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