In Uganda, many people illegally hunt, traffic or trade wildlife because other opportunities to earn money are limited. But poaching is also driven by anger and resentment towards increasing conflict between humans and wildlife, and the feeling among communities that parks don’t take their concerns seriously or do enough to support them.

TRAFFIC is working in partnership with IUCN through the USAID Wildlife TRAPS Project to explore how social and behavioural change could play a part in motivating people towards choosing safer and more sustainable patterns of wildlife trade and product consumption.

Weaknesses and loopholes in maritime supply chains are often exploited by traffickers to smuggle illegal wildlife and timber products to feed growing demand, predominantly in Asian markets. Together, TRAFFIC and WWF are supporting the shipping sector to detect illegalities passing through global waters.

As Hong Kong moves towards the final step of a landmark ivory ban, TRAFFIC has released a report that acknowledges progress, but urges tighter regulation on privately owned ivory stocks, antique ivory and licensing to prevent these products from entering illicit markets.

Given the emergence of the global health crisis in 2020 and the economic fallout thereafter, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and its partners, discussed the need to initiate discourse on mainstreaming nature into the economic recovery process in India.

New research reveals how traffickers are robbing the world’s most wildlife-rich region of its natural wealth.

Chinese banks must take action to prevent illegal wildlife traffickers from exploiting their networks to launder money says TRAFFIC.

The Case Digest- An Initial Analysis of the Financial Flows and Payment Mechanisms Behind Wildlife and Forest Crime, provides a thorough examination of the financial data from more than 40 wildlife crime cases from across the globe, including 11 detailed case studies.

An assessment of the routes, networks and methods used for trafficking wildlife and other illicit goods such as drugs and weapons between 2015-2019 has evidenced a high degree of interconnection, which could prove fundamental to disrupting illicit activities.

Wanting to provide for a family or the lack of financial security are cited as key motivators for people caught illegally trading wildlife in Namibia, according to a new report released by TRAFFIC.

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