Weak legislation and limited checks on private captive tiger facilities across the EU and the UK provide significant opportunity for tiger parts, such as skins and bones, to enter illegal trade, according to a joint report from WWF and TRAFFIC, Falling Through the System: The role of the European Union captive tiger population in the trade in ti

Future pandemics will emerge more often, spread more rapidly, do more damage to the world economy and kill more people than COVID-19 unless there is a transformative change in the global approach to dealing with infectious diseases, warns this major new report on biodiversity and pandemics by 22 leading experts from around the world.

The extent to which the Chinese Government supports the continued use of pangolins, the world’s most trafficked mammal, is revealed in a new EIA report.Four months ago, Chinese State media reported that pangolin scales had been removed from traditional medicines – but research has found it is still business as usual.

Illegal trafficking and unsustainable trade in wildlife are causing unprecedented declines in some species. They can also potentially lead to the spread of zoonoses, such as SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19.

A summary of the findings from the interviews is published today in The People Beyond the Poaching: Interviews with convicted offenders in South Africa. Almost three-quarters of offenders had been imprisoned for rhino-related crimes, the remainder for abalone- and cycad-related offences.

Ahead of World Elephant Day, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Secretariat, TRAFFIC and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) publish the Identification Guide for Ivory and Ivory Substitutes, a comprehensive and accessible resource for identifying the most commonly found ivories and artificial substi

The endemic Philippine Pangolin Manis culionensis, known locally as balintong, occurs in the Palawan faunal region and has the most restricted range among the eight pangolin species, with a decreasing population trend.

Millions of native animals and large volumes of wildlife products are trafficked domestically and internationally in and from Brazil each year, but a lack of good quality data, data sharing, and enforcement co-ordination between states and federal authorities conceal the true extent of the illicit trade finds a new TRAFFIC report, Wildlife Traff

The World Wildlife Crime Report 2020 outlines how trafficking in some wild species, which are then butchered and sold illegally, can increase the transmission of diseases that spread from animals to humans.

Ivory trade is rife on social media in Indonesia, Thailand and Viet Nam says a TRAFFIC study which found thousands of ivory items in trade during a month in 2016, and in a 2019 update.

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