Exotic wild animals are being smuggled into Japan and once past Customs border controls, continue to be legally sold as pets finds a new TRAFFIC report, Crossing the red line: Japan’s exotic pet trade. The study also highlights the potential for the exotic pet trade to facilitate the transmission of zoonotic diseases.

A TRAFFIC analysis finds a significant increase in reported poaching of wild animals in India during the lockdown period that is not restricted to any geographical region or state or to any specific wildlife area.

A new analysis of wildlife trafficking seizures in air transport reveals the illegal wildlife trade to be truly global in scope, encompassing additional airport locations as each year goes by.

With COVID-19 cases, related human mortality and socio-economic disruption rising rapidly around the globe there are overwhelming reasons to concentrate on immediate emergency responses, the here and the now.

Southeast Asia, perhaps more than any other region, encapsulates the full range of global challenges facing the management of biodiversity and trade in wildlife. Political and socio-economic disparities are large.

A newly released study carried out by TRAFFIC and commissioned by the CITES Secretariat documents thousands of marine turtles and their parts found in seizures, in both physical and online markets in Indonesia, Malaysia and Viet Nam.

The illegal trade in bear parts for traditional medicine persists in Malaysia with a higher percentage of shops selling products claiming to contain some form of bear bile now, compared to four years ago.

TRAFFIC's latest analysis on illegal trade of tortoises and freshwater turtles in India over a 10-year period i.e. September 2009–September 2019, has found at least 1,11,312 tortoises and freshwater turtles reported in illegal wildlife trade, that comes to more than 11,000 individual animals every year since 2009.

Imports of wildlife regulated under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) into Macau doubled in a decade and are poised to continue increasing, prompting the need for stronger legislation, enforcement, and awareness, according to a new TRAFFIC report.

Almost 600,000 metric tonnes of sharks and rays caught each year by world’s top 20 catchers. A TRAFFIC study has identified the world’s top 20 shark and ray catchers and traders, who collectively account for some 80% of global reported catch averaged by year between 2007–2017.

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