Weak legislation and limited checks on private captive tiger facilities across the EU and the UK provide significant opportunity for tiger parts, such as skins and bones, to enter illegal trade, according to a joint report from WWF and TRAFFIC, Falling Through the System: The role of the European Union captive tiger population in the trade in ti

Illegal trafficking and unsustainable trade in wildlife are causing unprecedented declines in some species. They can also potentially lead to the spread of zoonoses, such as SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19.

Since the first reports of novel pneumonia (COVID-19) in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, there has been considerable discussion on the origin of the causative virus, SARS-CoV-23 (also referred to as HCoV-19).

Around the world, it is estimated that one in three women and girls will experience gender-based violence (GBV) during her lifetime (World Bank, 2019).

A newly released study carried out by TRAFFIC and commissioned by the CITES Secretariat documents thousands of marine turtles and their parts found in seizures, in both physical and online markets in Indonesia, Malaysia and Viet Nam.

The illegal trade in bear parts for traditional medicine persists in Malaysia with a higher percentage of shops selling products claiming to contain some form of bear bile now, compared to four years ago.

A new report finds that both legal and illegal trade are detrimental to the conservation of Africa’s iconic wildlife.

TRAFFIC's latest analysis on illegal trade of tortoises and freshwater turtles in India over a 10-year period i.e. September 2009–September 2019, has found at least 1,11,312 tortoises and freshwater turtles reported in illegal wildlife trade, that comes to more than 11,000 individual animals every year since 2009.

Imports of wildlife regulated under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) into Macau doubled in a decade and are poised to continue increasing, prompting the need for stronger legislation, enforcement, and awareness, according to a new TRAFFIC report.

This compilation of case studies has been published in advance of the First Regional Conference on the Illegal Trade in Wildlife in Latin America held in Lima, Peru, on 3 and 4 October 2019. It highlights evidence from 15 countries across Latin America including Colombia, Peru, Mexico, Honduras, Guyana and Ecuador to name a few.

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