Visualizing how corruption manifests along the supply chain can help conservation practitioners and wildlife management agencies better understand both the specific risks and the potential responses to combat illegal rhino horn and other illicit wildlife trades.

Overall, whole tigers, dead and live, as well as a variety of tiger parts equal to a conservative estimate of 3,377 tigers were confiscated between January 2000 and June 2022 across 50 countries and territories, with data showing an increasing trend.

Thoroughly investigating corruption in a wildlife crime court case can disrupt organized criminal groups to a greater extent by potentially identifying higher-level individuals for investigation, arrest, conviction, and appropriate sentencing.

It is estimated that between 50%-90% of Africa’s trade in tropical timber and products is illegal which has a significant negative impact on any national economy. It is well-documented that economic activities operating outside the law impact the economy, exacerbate poverty and worsen the quality of forest management.

Weaknesses and loopholes in maritime supply chains are often exploited by traffickers to smuggle illegal wildlife and timber products to feed growing demand, predominantly in Asian markets. Together, TRAFFIC and WWF are supporting the shipping sector to detect illegalities passing through global waters.

As Hong Kong moves towards the final step of a landmark ivory ban, TRAFFIC has released a report that acknowledges progress, but urges tighter regulation on privately owned ivory stocks, antique ivory and licensing to prevent these products from entering illicit markets.

Chinese banks must take action to prevent illegal wildlife traffickers from exploiting their networks to launder money says TRAFFIC.

The Case Digest- An Initial Analysis of the Financial Flows and Payment Mechanisms Behind Wildlife and Forest Crime, provides a thorough examination of the financial data from more than 40 wildlife crime cases from across the globe, including 11 detailed case studies.

An assessment of the routes, networks and methods used for trafficking wildlife and other illicit goods such as drugs and weapons between 2015-2019 has evidenced a high degree of interconnection, which could prove fundamental to disrupting illicit activities.

A suite of TRAFFIC reports into high-value African marine products highlights yet another burgeoning, under-reported, unsustainable, and illegal trade that threatens the long-term survival of key marine species and the potential for sustainable human development.

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