The Policy brief summarizes the findings of an investigation into the effectiveness of policy interventions addressing illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade, including legislative and enforcement measures, measures to influence consumer behavior, trade policy responses and engagement of local communities.

Illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is devastating populations of iconic wildlife species such as rhinos and elephants, as well as lesser known ones such as pangolins, sturgeon and rosewood. As well as being a growing threat to conservation, IWT also has significant socioeconomic impacts.

A new report from the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) shows that Ghana itself faces a harrowing rosewood problem of its own.

Dist. administration to verify permissions accorded ‘illegally’ to mine manganese

Chennai: The Madras high court has directed Tiruvallur collector to explain why action has not been taken against district authorities, including district revenue officer (DRO), for failing to impl

Running Out of Time examines the fast-growing role of Vietnam as a hub for illegal wildlife trade and the country's failure to respond to the crisis.

While the Centre has initiated the “Jal Shakti Abhiyan” for water conservation across the country on July 1, the illegal mining has already played havoc with the water table in the district, with t

The Democratic Republic of Congo will begin forcibly removing some 10,000 artisanal miners from the Glencore mines where nearly four dozen people died last week, according to Bloomberg.

These Good Practice Guidelines identify principles for choosing the right messenger for communications aimed at reducing demand for illegal wildlife products.

African elephant poaching rates have dropped by 60 per cent in six years, an international study has found.

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