In a first-of-its-kind analysis of wild species trade in Central Asia, this report sets out to establish a baseline assessment of the levels and dynamics of both legal and illegal wild species trade in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan, paving the way for future studies to delve deeper into the species involved, their purposes,

The Wildlife Justice Commission is publishing a new report on the convergence of wildlife crime with other forms of organised crime: Convergence of wildlife crime with other forms of organised crime: A 2023 Review.

Environmental crime is on the rise and is of growing concern to policy makers, to legitimate businesses, and more broadly to the general public.

This joint paper by the Taskforce on Nature Markets and TRAFFIC asserts the crucial role of the business and finance sectors in facilitating strong nature markets and purging illegal and unsustainable trade in their commerce.

This new TRAFFIC and WWF ‘Wildlife Money Trails’ report aims to help law enforcement authorities and financial institutions uncover financial crimes related to wildlife and timber trafficking in the EU. The report features 16 case studies amounting to 18 million euros of illicit profits.

This new TRAFFIC study reveals Southeast Asia’s significant role in the legal and illicit trade of Madagascar’s rare and endemic wildlife and calls for intensified international co-operation to stem biodiversity loss.

Visualizing how corruption manifests along the supply chain can help conservation practitioners and wildlife management agencies better understand both the specific risks and the potential responses to combat illegal rhino horn and other illicit wildlife trades.

Overall, whole tigers, dead and live, as well as a variety of tiger parts equal to a conservative estimate of 3,377 tigers were confiscated between January 2000 and June 2022 across 50 countries and territories, with data showing an increasing trend.

Thoroughly investigating corruption in a wildlife crime court case can disrupt organized criminal groups to a greater extent by potentially identifying higher-level individuals for investigation, arrest, conviction, and appropriate sentencing.

It is estimated that between 50%-90% of Africa’s trade in tropical timber and products is illegal which has a significant negative impact on any national economy. It is well-documented that economic activities operating outside the law impact the economy, exacerbate poverty and worsen the quality of forest management.

Pages