The Conference of the Parties, at its 18th meeting (CoP18, Geneva, 2019), adopted Decisions 18.33 to 18.37 on Livelihoods.

Habitat destruction and illegal wildlife trade (IWT) have devastating impacts on the populations of numerous wildlife species around the world. IWT is associated with the demand for wildlife and wildlife products from markets around the globe but primarily from Asia and South East Asia.

Imports of wildlife regulated under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) into Macau doubled in a decade and are poised to continue increasing, prompting the need for stronger legislation, enforcement, and awareness, according to a new TRAFFIC report.

Almost 600,000 metric tonnes of sharks and rays caught each year by world’s top 20 catchers. A TRAFFIC study has identified the world’s top 20 shark and ray catchers and traders, who collectively account for some 80% of global reported catch averaged by year between 2007–2017.

Sri Lanka hosts the latest CITES conference this May, where member states will consider proposals for protections for a wide range of species.

Several African countries with some of the largest elephant populations are calling for looser controls on legal ivory trade, while another group of countries on the continent say tighter controls

The new study, Wildlife trade in Belgium: An analysis of CITES trade and seizure data, examines trade in species listed under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and builds on earlier studies identifying Belgium as an important destination and transit point of such species, particularly fr

A new TRAFFIC study has shed light on the trade in precious corals in East Asia, revealing that inconsistent trade data and questionable harvesting practices could threaten vulnerable species.

More than 1.3-million live animals and plants, 1.5-million skins and two thousand tonnes of meat from CITES-listed species have been exported from 41 African countries to East and Southeast Asia since 2006, a ground-breaking new TRAFFIC report funded by Arcadia and published reveals.

This report presents the first comprehensive overview of international trade in CITES-listed wildlife in the Amazon countries: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela.

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