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Even though Indigenous Peoples’ practices have little impact on greenhouse gas emissions and global warming, climate change and extreme weather events aggravated by the COVID-19 health crisis have had an enormous impact on their livelihoods, cultures, identities and rights.

This summary highlights findings of three RRI studies conducted in 2020 as they relate to the DRC.

This publication provides an overview of the common and unique sustainability elements of Indigenous Peoples' food systems, in terms of natural resource management, access to the market, diet diversity, indigenous peoples’ governance systems, and links to traditional knowledge and indigenous languages.

This publication provides an overview of the common and unique sustainability elements of Indigenous Peoples' food systems, in terms of natural resource management, access to the market, diet diversity, indigenous peoples’ governance systems, and links to traditional knowledge and indigenous languages.

This summary highlights Kenya-specific findings of three RRI studies conducted in 2020 on: The estimated area of land and territories where the rights of Indigenous Peoples, local communities and Afro-descendants have not been recognized.

This study reviews the status of the legal recognition of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and Afro-descendant Peoples to the carbon in their lands and territories across 31 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

The fulfilment of a broad range of human rights depend on thriving biodiversity as well as healthy habitats and ecosystems. These rights include the rights to food, clean air and water, health, culture, and even the right to life. Conversely, biodiversity and habitat loss can result in violations of these and other human rights.

This publication provides an overview of the common and unique sustainability elements of Indigenous Peoples' food systems, in terms of natural resource management, access to the market, diet diversity, indigenous peoples’ governance systems, and links to traditional knowledge and indigenous languages.

This analysis shows that the vast majority of tropical forested countries seeking to benefit from international forest carbon markets have yet to define in law and in practice the rights of Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and Afro-descendant Peoples over carbon in their customary lands and territories.

Criminalisation and violence towards Indigenous Peoples are even more worrying in times of pandemics, when they are already in a more vulnerable situation due to the virus and the lack of effective access to health services, as well as lowered protection in laws and regulations that apply to Indigenous Peoples.

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