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Indigenous peoples in many regions have a long history of devastation from epidemics brought by colonizers, from the arrival of the first Europeans in the Americas who brought smallpox and influenza to a measles outbreak among the Yanonami of Brazil and Southern Venezuela in the 1950s/60s that nearly decimated the tribe.

The plight of indigenous peoples has drawn increased attention in recent years as they strive to retain their cultures and protect their ecosystems, lands and food traditions in the face of globalisation.

Indigenous Peoples globally are among those who are most acutely experiencing the mental health impacts of climate change; however, little is known about the ways in which Indigenous Peoples globally experience climate-sensitive mental health impacts and outcomes, and how these experiences may vary depending on local socio-cultural contexts, geographical location, and regional variations in climate change.

The Conference of the Parties, at its 18th meeting (CoP18, Geneva, 2019), adopted Decisions 18.33 to 18.37 on Livelihoods.

The involvement of indigenous peoples is key to achieving the ambitions of the SDGs. On the one hand, they hold valuable knowledge and traditions that provide solutions to major challenges, including those related to sustainable natural resource management, climate resilience, and promoting food systems that provide healthy nutrition for all.

The UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) has released the fourth edition of the ‘State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples’ (SOWIP). The report was launched on the 12th anniversary of the UN General Assembly’s (UNGA) adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (DRIP).

Forest and land degradation undermines the foundation of human prosperity and well-being.

This brief summarizes findings from the first international comparative assessment on the extent to which various national-level legal frameworks recognize the freshwater rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities, as well as the specific rights of women to use and govern community waters.

Agrobiodiversity is a resource that supports human and environmental wellbeing.

Historically, the injustices confronting women with regard to community land rights have been widespread. They are commonly perpetuated by patriarchal community-level practices, customary laws, and formal laws passed by governments, all of which either overlook or directly discriminate against indigenous and rural women’s tenure rights.

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