The fifth volume of the Report of the Committee on Doubling Farmers’ Income (DFI) examines the strengths, weakness and reforms in the agricultural system. The focus is on promoting a sustainability approach in the future development of India’s agricultural system.

This study provides application of Resourcesat-2 AWiFS satellite imagery for forest burnt area assessment in India. AWiFS datasets covering peak forest fire months of 2014 have been analysed. The total burnt area under vegetation cover (forest, scrub and grasslands) of India was estimated as 57,127.75 sq. km. In 2014, 7% of forest cover of India was affected by fires. Of the major forest types, dry deciduous forests are affected by the highest burnt area, followed by moist deciduous forests.

This study was carried out to simulate the forest cover changes in India using Land Change Modeler. Classified multi-temporal long-term forest cover data was used to generate the forest covers of 1880 and 2025. The spatial data were overlaid with variables such as the proximity to roads, settlements, water bodies, elevation and slope to determine the relationship between forest cover change and explanatory variables. The predicted forest cover in 1880 indicates an area of 10,42,008 km², which represents 31.7% of the geographical area of India.

REDD+, agroforestry systems have the potential to reduce deforestation and forest degradation directly and indirectly. They supply timber and fuel wood that would otherwise be sourced from adjacent forests.

Living with fire is a challenge for human communities because they are influenced by socio-economic, political, ecological and climatic processes at various spatial and temporal scales. Over the course of 2 days, the authors discussed how communities could live with fire challenges at local, national and transnational scales. Exploiting our diverse, international and interdisciplinary expertise, we outline generalizable properties of fire-adaptive communities in varied settings where cultural knowledge of fire is rich and diverse.

Wildfire has been an important process affecting the Earth's surface and atmosphere for over 350 million years and human societies have coexisted with fire since their emergence. Yet many consider wildfire as an accelerating problem, with widely held perceptions both in the media and scientific papers of increasing fire occurrence, severity and resulting losses. However, important exceptions aside, the quantitative evidence available does not support these perceived overall trends.

The National Sample Survey Office (NSSO), as a part of its 70th round during the period January 2013 - December 2013, carried out an all India household survey on the situation of Land and Livestock Holdings in India.

The recent episode of an oppressive smog that blanketed Southeast Asia highlights an entirely new kind of problem in contemporary international relations, namely, the complexity of transnational governance when traditional remedies--from bombs and missiles at one extreme, to diplomatic démarches and summits on the more polite end--are of no use at all.

North East India (NEI) has 17.2 M ha under forest cover, which is ~25% of India’s total forest area. Of the total forest cover, 1.5 M ha is currently managed by shifting cultivation in NEI. Shifting cultivation, an integral part of culture and tradition of tribes of NEI, is presently unsustainable because of the populationdriven reduction in the duration of the fallow cycle (3–5 years).

Original Source

In this study, researchers explored the relationships between the satellite-retrievedfire counts(FC), fire radiative power(FRP) and aerosol indices using multi-satellite datasets at a daily time-step covering ten different biomass burning regions in Asia.Wefirst assessed the variations inMODIS-retrieved aerosol optical depths (AOD’s)in agriculture,forests, plantation and peat land burning regions and then usedMODIS FC and FRP (hereafter FC/FRP)to explain the variations in AOD characteristics.

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