Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) is a key nature-based solution (NBS) for the forest sector.

Land is source and sink of carbon dioxide due to anthropogenic and natural drivers. Global models estimate net carbon dioxide emissions of 5.2 ± 2.6 GtCO2eq yr–1 (likely range) from land use and land-use change during 2007–2016.

This paper discusses how debt-for-climate swaps can be useful “triple-win” instruments to address the climate crisis by ensuring the protection of valuable terrestrial and marine ecosystems, while also contributing to debt sustainability.

This report provides an update on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation Plus (REDD+) forest reference (emission) levels (FREL/FRLs) and REDD+ results submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and relevant developments under the Green Climate Fund concerning REDD+ results-based payments.

Indigenous populations of the Amazon own 210 million hectares of land and have proven to be highly skilled in the field of forest conservation: the deforestation rate is 0.8%, i.e., even less than that of protected areas (1.1%) and obviously significantly lower than that of the Amazon as a whole.However, under the rules of the game as set forth

This report summarizes the REDD+ experience over the past decade. It draws on research conducted under the Global Comparative Study on REDD+ by the Center for International Forestry Research to take stock of lessons learned from REDD+ implementation to inform future forest-based climate change mitigation activities.

This volume brings together a new set of multi-country empirical case studies that contribute to the understanding the complexities of development and resource governance in the context of climate change in the Mekong Region.

The UNFCCC’s Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture creates an opening for agroforestry to take on an important role in Africa’s response to climate change.

This book provides a critical, evidence-based analysis of REDD+ implementation so far, without losing sight of the urgent need to reduce forest-based emissions to prevent catastrophic climate change. REDD+ as envisioned has not been tested at scale. Results-based payment, the novel feature of REDD+, has gone untested.

About half of developing countries express ambition to use agroforestry—the integration of trees with crops, livestock and other non-forest timber products—for adaptation and mitigation of climate change.

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