Timber harvest from tropical regions generates seven billion dollars annually in exports and is estimated to occur across 20% of the area of remaining tropical forests. This timber harvesting is estimated to account for more than one in eight of all greenhouse gas emissions from tropical forests. Yet there is currently no means to independently estimate extracted volumes and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

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REDD+ (Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation) is an UN-led programme aiming to increase carbon sequestration in tropical forests.

Mitigation of greenhouse gases in the land sector is complex and has a unique set of challenges.

The initiative known as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, Conservation and Enhancement of Forest Carbon and Sustainable Forest Management (REDD+) focuses on avoiding deforestation and forest degradation, conserving and sustainably managing forests, and enhancing forest carbon stocks.

Over 100 civil society organisations from 15 states highlight the loopholes in the Centre’s draft National Forest Policy 2018 and demand withdrawl of this draft National Forest Policy, 2018

The Chief Executive of the Forestry Commission, Mr Kwadwo Owusu Afriyie has reiterated the commitment of the Commission to help reduce carbon emissions in Cocoa-forest landscapes through the Ghana

This report identifies the sources of funding currently available for REDD+ and climate action in forests, and analyzes the challenges and opportunities for accessing and coordinating this finance.

The United Nations Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (UN-REDD Programme) has trained about 800 people from forest reserved Communities of Cross River state o

Partnership between the public and private sectors can offer advantages to all stakeholders in REDD+, providing finance, technology and project skills. Private sector companies may play various roles in REDD+, but there must be a business case for them to do so.

Limited data exists on emissions from agriculture-driven deforestation, and available data are typically uncertain. In this paper, we provide comparable estimates of emissions from both all deforestation and agriculture-driven deforestation, with uncertainties for 91 countries across the tropics between 1990 and 2015. Uncertainties associated with input datasets (activity data and emissions factors) were used to combine the datasets, where most certain datasets contribute the most. This method utilizes all the input data, while minimizing the uncertainty of the emissions estimate.

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