A new report from WRI India found that the Sidhi district could economically and ecologically benefit from landscape restoration. When implemented at scale in Sidhi, restoring land could conserve biodiversity, improve water recharge, sequester carbon, enhance rural livelihoods and spur rural development.

This working paper examines case studies of three communities in Bhutan, Ethiopia, and Costa Rica that are already experiencing severe impacts of climate change. These case studies explore the incremental and transformative adaptation measures they have adopted or will need to in the future.

It is estimated that 20% of global land is either degraded or undergoing degradation, leading to an annual loss of 12 million hectares of productive land (UNCCD 2017). In Africa, some 715 million ha are degraded, including 65% of all arable land, 30% of all grazing land and 20% of all forests.

Recent major international reports have highlighted the alarming impact of food production systems on climate change, land and biodiversity.

Land degradation exacerbates the unique vulnerabilities of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) to environmental challenges, such as climate change, flash floods, soil erosion, lagoon siltation, coastal erosion and sea level rise, undermining their economic potential.

At present, our ability to comprehend the dynamics of food systems and the consequences of their rapid ‘transformations’ is limited. In this paper, we propose to address this gap by exploring the interactions between the sustainability of food systems and a set of key drivers at the global scale.

Water scarcity is already widespread and remains on the rise: it is found in nearly every region in the world. Around 36% of the world’s population is currently living in water-scarce regions. This publication shows that avoiding, reducing and reversing land degradation have positive long-term gains in water security.

Submission of Central Pollution Control Board report in compliance of National Green Tribunal order of January 30, 2020 in the matter of O. A. No. 1016 of 2019, Utkarsh Panwar Vs CPCB & Others and O.A. No. 1088/2018 Dinesh Chahal & Others Vs Union of India & Others.

In essence, the notion of benefit sharing is recognition of the natural rights of affected communities over mineral resources in their traditional and historical homelands. Communities have a right to benefit first—culturally, economically and politically. These rights can be seen from the prism of both immediate as well as long-term benefits.

Question raised in Rajya Sabha on Measures to reduce land degradation, 09/12/2019. Various steps have been taken by the Government of India to reduce land degradation and desertification of land to ensure food security.

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