The report examines the developments in inclusive education since the Salamanca Statement and Framework for Action on Special Needs Education in 1994. It includes contributions from Agency staff and other education specialists from around the world to provide a detailed exploration of inclusive education over the last 25 years.

In a statement, eight UN organizations stress that international transport and integrated supply chains are critical in recovering from COVID-19 achieving the SDGs.

New analysis reveals the number of children living in multidimensional poverty – without access to education, health, housing, nutrition, sanitation, or water – has increased by 15 per cent since the start of the pandemic.

The point of the report is to track (and promote) progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals, and the big thing standing in the way of that progress right now is the pandemic. People living just above the extreme poverty line who have fallen below it because of COVID-19 were obviously vulnerable despite not being officially poor.

The world was already off track to meet the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 and the COVID-19 pandemic has made it even harder both to achieve the Goals and to monitor progress where it is being made, according to a new report released by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

A World in Disorder, issued by the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB), an independent monitoring and accountability body which prepares for global health crises, (GPMB), notes that the coronavirus has killed close to a million people, impacting health systems, food supplies and economies.

This is the inaugural edition of the Ecological Threat Register (ETR), which covers 157 independent states and territories.

No one, it seems, is entirely free from the risk of exposure to COVID-19. However, migrants, including people seeking asylum and refugees, face greater risks than others.

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a tragic toll on lives and livelihoods and will greatly impact global energy use in the near term. Energy demand will fall 8% this year, and with a slow recovery, our whole energy demand forecast is rebased downwards by 8% relative to our previous forecast through to 2050.

The global Living Planet Index continues to decline. It shows an average 68% decrease in population sizes of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish between 1970 and 2016. A 94% decline in the LPI for the tropical sub regions of the Americas is the largest fall observed in any part of the world.

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