Battery storage, green hydrogen and flexible coal-fired power generation can help India address its next big challenge of integrating large-scale variable renewable energy into the electricity grid over the next decade, according to a new report from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).

A new regulation that excludes rooftop solar systems over 10 kilowatts (kW) from net metering will stall adoption of larger installations in India, undermining progress towards the government’s rooftop solar target of 40 gigawatts (GW) by 2022.

As the energy sector moves away from fossil fuels and shifts towards a greater share of renewables and greater electrification, these tax revenues will come under strain.

The India Energy Outlook 2021 is a new special report from the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook series. The report explores the opportunities and challenges ahead for India as it seeks to ensure reliable, affordable and sustainable energy to a growing population.

This case study shows how clean, affordable and reliable electricity can be provided to thousands of people even in the poorest, most remote and difficult terrains.

According to the report 'Capital Flows Underpinning India's Energy Transformation' released by Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), India needs an Investment of USD 500 Billion to reach its target of 450 Gigawatts (GW) of Renewable Energy (RE) by 2030.

This report, commissioned by the Korean Ministry of Trade Industry and Energy and written jointly by the International Energy Agency and the Korea Energy Economics Institute, examines current conditions and future opportunities to ensure electricity security and system flexibility with higher shares of variable renewable energy in Korea.

Beyond the Grid Fund for Zambia is notable for the scale and speed with which it has provided clean solar electricity.

Access to reliable, affordable, sustainable and safe energy is recognised as an enabler of many development objectives. Yet energy infrastructure is often planned as standalone investment, from a purely economic and technological standpoint and in a top-down way that does not take into account the needs of end users.

Renewable electricity, specifically wind power and solar photovoltaic (PV), has become the most economical sources of electricity in many parts of the world.

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