An energy system centred on renewable energy can help resolve many of Africa’s social, economic, health and environmental challenges. A profound energy transition is not only feasible, it is essential for a climate-safe future in which sustainable development prerogatives are met.

The year 2021 placed exceptional demands on electricity markets around the world. Strong economic growth, combined with more extreme weather conditions than in 2020, including a colder than average winter, boosted global electricity demand by more than 6% – the largest increase since the recovery from the financial crisis in 2010.

The Ministry of Power through a notification dated 20th December, 2021 has issued the draft Electricity (Late Payment Surcharge and related matters) Rules, 2021.

Rapid growth of distributed photovoltaics (DPV) has upended the paradigm of one-way power from the grid. Solar electricity systems located close to consumers empower them to self-supply and feed into the grid. For utilities, the impacts—positive or negative—depend on how DPV is deployed.

For the fourth consecutive year, Uganda’s electricity sector is Africa’s best regulated across a number of key metrics, according to the African Development Bank’s 2021 Electricity Regulatory Index. Other strong performers include East African neighbours, Kenya and Tanzania, as well as Namibia and Egypt.

Hydropower is typically subject to strong seasonality’s, driven by rainfall patterns, snowmelt and other hydrological phenomena.

Coal 2021 is the world’s most comprehensive forecast of coal demand, supply and trade, based on detailed analysis of the most recent data at country and sectoral level, broken down by coal grade (thermal coal, coking coal, pulverised coal injection and lignite).

Renewables 2021 is the IEA’s primary analysis on the sector, based on current policies and market developments. It forecasts the deployment of renewable energy technologies in electricity, transport and heat to 2026 while also exploring key challenges to the industry and identifying barriers to faster growth.

This paper is part of WRI’s Energy for Development Initiative, which integrates clean energy into strategies for improving development outcomes across the Indian states of Assam, Jharkhand, and Rajasthan.

EnergyNet has published a new report exploring the need for captive power producers to find a way to co-exist with the grid. The Chain Effect: Industrial energy policy in Africa in an era of captive power – a case study of Ghana & Kenya report asks how can nations achieve their industry goals if their energy policy do not align?

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