Some Works Still Pending In Powerhouse, Tunnel: NHPC Sources

This report presents an Integrated Context Analysis (ICA) of vulnerability to food insecurity and natural hazards in Pakistan, based on existing datasets to identify and rank districts by the level of these risks.

The adoption of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Climate Change Agreement, all in 2015, highlights the strength of international commitment behind climate compatible development.

With nearly half the world’s population affected by water scarcity and demand for freshwater continuing to soar, a WWF report released at the 20th International Riversymposium in Brisbane shows how governments can successfully protect and restore river flows – helping to ensure sufficient water for people and nature.

Despite significant economic growth in Asia in recent decades, millions of people in rural Asia still lack access to electricity. A project has been implemented to develop small hybrid renewable energy systems in these areas. This publication highlights the experiences of these pilot projects in five developing member countries.

In the desert community of Sibi in southwest Balochistan province, where the mercury hit 52.4 degrees Celsius (126 Fahrenheit) this summer, people crowd into any available shade or mud-soaked strea

This country profile provides a comprehensive overview of climate change science and policy in Pakistan, drawing insights from national and international literature. Catastrophic floods, droughts, and cyclones have plagued Pakistan in recent years. The 2010 flood killed 1,600 people and caused around $10 billion in damage.

ISLAMABAD - Pakistan's northwestern province, Khyber Pakhtunkhaw (KPK), has planted an unprecedented 1 billion trees in just more than two years and surpassed an international commitment of restori

Temperatures in the Indo-Gangetic Plains would exceed the upper limit of what normally people can tolerate

Extreme heatwaves that kill even healthy people within hours will strike parts of the Indian subcontinent unless global carbon emissions are cut sharply and soon, according to new research.

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