Each year, WHO’s World malaria report offers in-depth information on the latest trends in malaria control and elimination at global, regional and country levels. The report highlights progress towards global targets and describes opportunities and challenges for curbing and eliminating the disease.

By 2050, nearly 7 out of 10 people globally will live in cities and other urban settings. While urbanization, overall, is expected to reduce malaria transmission, unplanned urbanization will likely result in a malaria disease burden that is disproportionately high among the urban poor.

The annual Commonwealth Malaria Report has revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted malaria services, leading to an increase in malaria incidence and mortality rates. Data from the report also indicates that the Commonwealth is currently not on track to halve malaria cases and/or deaths by 2023.

Each year, WHO’s World malaria report offers in-depth information on the latest trends in malaria control and elimination at global, regional and country levels. The report highlights progress towards global targets and describes opportunities and challenges for curbing and eliminating the disease.

Insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) are highly effective for the control of malaria. Yet widely distributed ITNs have been repurposed as fishing nets throughout the world.

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The 2020 edition of the World malaria report takes a historical look at key milestones that helped shape the global response to the disease over the last 2 decades – a period of unprecedented success in malaria control.

The point of the report is to track (and promote) progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals, and the big thing standing in the way of that progress right now is the pandemic. People living just above the extreme poverty line who have fallen below it because of COVID-19 were obviously vulnerable despite not being officially poor.

A new report has shown that deaths from HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria could double if systems for health are overwhelmed, treatment and prevention programmes are disrupted and resources are diverted.

Studies in mild-to-moderate cases as well as severe disease leave us still searching for a magic pill. (Editorial)

The objective of the study wast to assess the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine in patients admitted to hospital with coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) pneumonia who require oxygen.

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