WHO's latest report spotlights critical gaps in prevention coverage, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. An estimated 43% of people at risk of malaria in the region were not protected by either a net or indoor insecticide spraying in 2015.

The Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection is one of the major public health problems in Nepal because of its increasing disease morbidity and mortality. The main purpose of this study was to determine the anti-JEV IgM positivity among acute encephalitis syndromic cases from all over Nepal. The present study was conducted at National Public Health Laboratory, Kathmandu, Nepal from April 2015 to October 2015. A total of 671 (418 CSF and 253 serum) samples were collected from 625 patients with acute encephalitic syndrome, admitted to different hospitals from all over Nepal.

In Africa, a combination of better medicines and the widespread use of insecticides to kill mosquitoes has led to the decline in malaria cases and deaths. Millions of people in places like Dano are living longer, healthier lives because of this public health campaign. They are also more prosperous when they are malaria free, because the disease keeps kids home from school, prevents adults from working, and forces poor families to spend money on health care.

Improvements to housing may contribute to malaria control and elimination by reducing house entry by malaria vectors and thus exposure to biting. We tested the hypothesis that the odds of malaria infection are lower in modern, improved housing compared to traditional housing in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

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The ninth G-FINDER survey reports on 2015 global investment into research and development (R&D) of new products for neglected diseases, and identifies trends and patterns across the nine years of global G-FINDER data.

The World Malaria Report 2016 summarizes information received from malaria-endemic countries and other sources, and updates the analyses presented in the 2015 report. The World Malaria Report is WHO’s flagship malaria publication, released each year in December.

The transmission of the arboviral agents of dengue, yellow fever, Chikungunya, and Zika by Aedes mosquitoes represents expanding threats to global health. At the 69th World Health Assembly, the WHO Director-General Margaret Chan declared that the spread of the Zika virus was "the result of the abandon of mosquito control" by governments since the 1970s and urged Member States to mobilize more efforts and resources to prevent further spread of the diseases.

Insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs) are effective in preventing malaria where vectors primarily bite indoors and late at night, but their effectiveness is uncertain where vectors bite outdoors and earlier in the evening. We studied the effectiveness of ITNs following a mass distribution in Haiti from May to September, 2012, where the Anopheles albimanus vector bites primarily outdoors and often when people are awake.

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In this prospective observational study, Grant Dorsey and colleagues measure changes in malaria burden after long-lasting insecticidal net distribution and indoor residual spraying at three sites of in Uganda.

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Two South American metropolises are enlisting bacterium-infected mosquitoes to fight Zika. The effort is the world’s biggest test yet of an unconventional but promising approach to quell mosquito-borne diseases.

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