The Southern Africa economy is projected to grow slower than others in the continent—at 2.2 percent in 2019 and 2.8 percent in 2020. At the heart of this slow growth are the major headwinds of high inflation, increasing government debts, and tepid growth in South Africa, which contributes about two-thirds of the region’s GDP.

In 2018, real GDP in East Africa grew by an estimated 5.7 percent, slightly less than the 5.9 percent in 2017 and the highest among African regions. Economic growth is projected to remain strong, at 5.9 percent in 2019 and 6.1 percent in 2020. The countries with the highest economic growth are Ethiopia, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, and Djibouti.

In 2018, the GDP growth rate in Central Africa accelerated slightly, to 2.2 percent from 1.1 percent in 2017, but remained below the African average of 3.5 percent. Central Africa’s growth was driven primarily by the rebound in raw material prices, principally oil.

Overall economic growth in West Africa is projected to be at 3.6 percent in 2019 and 2020, boosted by the recovery of commodity prices and improved production and service sectors in the region, although challenges and uneven performance would remain, the African Development Bank’s regional economic indicator report revealed.

This year’s African Economic Outlook from the African Development Bank shows that the continent’s general economic performance continues to improve. Gross domestic product reached an estimated 3.5 percent in 2018, about the same as in 2017 and up from 2.1 percent in 2016.

Are poor macroeconomic outcomes primarily the result of economic policies, or of deeper underlying state fragility problems in sub-Saharan Africa?

The African Development Bank (AfDB) has launched a flagship economic report on Zimbabwe, titled: “Building a new Zimbabwe: Targeted policies for growth and job creation” which aims to support renewal and transformation of the country.

Opportunities for investment in Africa often outweigh the obstacles, according to leading African companies included in the African Development Bank’s first Africa-to-Africa (A2A) Investment Report.

The African Development Bank Group (AfDB) is delighted to present the 5th edition of Africa Tourism Monitor, which highlights travel and tourism as one of the fastest-growing and most interconnected sectors in the

This paper proposes an assessment of African countries’ growth patterns through the identification of acceleration episodes. About two-thirds of African countries have experienced at least one growth acceleration episode since the 1950s.

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