This is the twentieth volume of Gender, Poverty, and Environmental Indicators and progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals in African Countries published by the Statistics Department of the African Development Bank Group.

The African Statistical Yearbook (ASYB) 2019 is the tenth edition jointly produced by the African Development Bank (AfDB), the African Union Commission (AUC) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA).

Sub-Saharan African countries have been seeking ways to improve their economies, particularly as problems of malnutrition, poverty, and unemployment continue to plague the people. The challenges that most of the countries face on the continent resemble the challenges that some of the Asian countries have faced.

The African Development Bank, through its African Natural Resource Center (ANRC), is undertaking a study to review the land tenure systems in a number of African countries as part of a wider multi-country level study to support the creation of an enabling environment for Agricultural Transformation on the Continent. The Bank’s Feed Africa Agric

The Southern Africa economy is projected to grow slower than others in the continent—at 2.2 percent in 2019 and 2.8 percent in 2020. At the heart of this slow growth are the major headwinds of high inflation, increasing government debts, and tepid growth in South Africa, which contributes about two-thirds of the region’s GDP.

In 2018, real GDP in East Africa grew by an estimated 5.7 percent, slightly less than the 5.9 percent in 2017 and the highest among African regions. Economic growth is projected to remain strong, at 5.9 percent in 2019 and 6.1 percent in 2020. The countries with the highest economic growth are Ethiopia, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, and Djibouti.

In 2018, the GDP growth rate in Central Africa accelerated slightly, to 2.2 percent from 1.1 percent in 2017, but remained below the African average of 3.5 percent. Central Africa’s growth was driven primarily by the rebound in raw material prices, principally oil.

Overall economic growth in West Africa is projected to be at 3.6 percent in 2019 and 2020, boosted by the recovery of commodity prices and improved production and service sectors in the region, although challenges and uneven performance would remain, the African Development Bank’s regional economic indicator report revealed.

This year’s African Economic Outlook from the African Development Bank shows that the continent’s general economic performance continues to improve. Gross domestic product reached an estimated 3.5 percent in 2018, about the same as in 2017 and up from 2.1 percent in 2016.

Are poor macroeconomic outcomes primarily the result of economic policies, or of deeper underlying state fragility problems in sub-Saharan Africa?

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