The Horn of Africa is facing the third severe La Niña‑induced drought episode in a decade, and the region is on the verge of a catastrophe if humanitarian assistance is not urgently scaled up.

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, has experienced significant population growth and an increase in living standards for years, resulting in increased solid waste generation and solid waste management (SWM) challenges.

This paper argues for more creativity and flexibility in agricultural research for development (AR4D) scaling and impact evaluation in complex contexts.

This report is the synthesis of the key findings and recommendations of the studies carried out under the World Bank’s Ethiopia AQM ASA program. The rest of the report is organized as follows.

A groundbreaking report released by Energise Africa and Power for All identifies the major policy and financial barriers to investment in Ethiopia’s off-grid solar market.

The report is one of the deliverables of the World Bank’s Advisory Services & Analytics program entitled “Ethiopia: Air Quality Management and Urban Mobility.” It aims to assess mitigation options for transport emissions for Addis Ababa (AA) in the Ethiopian context and recommend priority measures for short- and mid-term actions.

The purpose of this study was to review selected National Adaptation Plans (NAPs)/Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and contributing documents to better understand how disaster risk management is approached in climate change documents, and if systemic risk issues where impacts cascade across sectors are considered.

The Ethiopia Summary Report summarizes the findings of the Fill the Nutrient Gap analysis carried out in Ethiopia in 2020, including analyses of the cost and affordability of nutritious diets by region and by zone. Fill the Nutrient Gap (FNG) initiative was brought to Ethiopia by UN World Food Programme (WFP).

Water is essential to sustainable economic growth and climate change adaptation. Ethiopia’s growth and development are vulnerable to water security risks. Despite being known as the “water tower of Africa,” Ethiopia is naturally exposed to highly variable rainfall.

The labor structure in sub-Saharan Africa is characterized by a high share of informal employment in the rural agricultural sector. The impact of COVID-19 on female employment may not appear to be large as the share of such employment is particularly high among women.

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