This joint ESCAP/RIMES advisory assesses the potential repercussions of the present situation, both, in terms of the climate and its possible societal impacts. It is intended to inform the efforts of Governments, development and humanitarian agencies to understand the risks and to mitigate the potential impacts.

KOLKATA: Even as the mercury dropped to the season’s lowest in Kolkata on Monday, the IMD predicted a warmer winter across Gangetic Bengal.

There is a 75-80% chance of an El Niño developing by February 2019, although it is not expected to be a strong event, according to the latest update from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Southern Africa is expected to receive erratic rainfall in the 2018/19 agricultural season, according to the latest outlook produced by regional climate experts, who have predicted that seasonal ra

In view of the potential impact of the 2018/19 El Niño on food security and agriculture, high risk countries in Southern Africa, Horn of Africa, Asia and the Pacific and Latin America should be prioritized for further monitoring, analysis and early action.

There is a 70-75 per cent chance of the El Niño weather pattern emerging during the northern hemisphere winter this year, a U.S. government weather forecaster said on Thursday.

Even as India has managed to increase its forest cover to over 20 per cent of its total geographical area, forest fires are a leading cause of degradation of the forest cover in the country says this new report released by the Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change

The 2015/2016 El Niño event caused severe changes in precipitation across the tropics. This impacted surface hydrology, such as river run-off and soil moisture availability, thereby triggering reductions in gross primary production (GPP).

This volume examines the causes and consequences of drought on Lebanon’s agriculture. Lebanon is getting hotter and dryer. Projections show droughts will likely become more frequent and severe.

As the summer planting season approaches in eastern Zimbabwe, small-scale farmers struggle with familiar questions: When will the rains come, and when should I sow my crops?

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