Coal based power plants are a major source of air pollution in India. After notification of emission standards for coal plants in December 2015, it’s been six years of sluggish implementation of the same resulting in huge health and economic damage costs.

This report “China Nationally Determined Contribution and Domestic 14th Power Five-Year-Plan” shows that power industry plans to build new coal-fired power plants after 2020 contradict China’s 2060 carbon neutrality target. The report calls for China to initiate a policy process to phase out coal-fired power plants.

Transboundary pollution in the surrounding provinces of Banten and West Java are major contributors to air pollution in Jakarta City. Air pollutant emissions both in Jakarta and in surrounding provinces have been increasing, worsening Jakarta’s air quality. Even with COVID-19, air quality in the capital city did not significantly improve.

According to the latest study released by CREA on behalf of the Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL) and the Global Climate and Health Alliance (GHCA), the air pollution in Bengaluru has dropped by 28% during the Indian megacity’s coronavirus lockdown.

On March 16, 2020, transportation and industries ground to a near halt in Metro Manila as the government enforced an “enhanced community quarantine” (ECQ) in the country’s busiest metropolis. The lockdown was only one of the many across the globe that was implemented in an effort to slow down the spread of COVID-19.

Levels of health-harming air pollutants in China have exceeded concentrations at the same time last year in the past 30 days, for the first time since the start of the COVID-19 crisis. This includes PM2.5, NO2, SO2 and ozone.

Bangladesh is among the countries most affected by air pollution, with the life expectancy in the country reduced by almost 2 years due to the impacts of pollution exposure on health.