This paper reviews recent developments in the European passenger car market and assesses the implications for the proposed post-2021 CO2 emissions targets.

Market analyses by vehicle segment, weight category, manufacturer, and engine size are needed to optimize vehicle emission standards and testing requirements. In India, these are largely adopted from Euro standards to fit the Indian landscape, and that was the case with the Bharat Stage (BS) VI regulations that took effect April 1, 2020.

On-road diesel vehicles are the leading contributor to air pollution and associated disease burdens. Besides the impact on air quality and public health, black carbon from diesel engine exhaust produces significant near-term climate warming.

In December 2020, the Ministry of Ecology and Environment (MEE) of China updated the China IV emission standards for non-road mobile machinery.

This study analyzes the real-world emissions of seven Euro VI-D trucks and evaluates the avenues for extending the in-use PEMS test provisions to better capture a wider range of frequently occurring conditions in real operation. The analysis finds that urban operation is responsible for 50% to 90% of total NOx emissions from the trucks tested.

Since the 1980s, China has implemented a series of policies and regulations to address harmful diesel emissions, and this report is a comprehensive overview of the best practices emerging from the Clean Diesel Program.

With introduction of the EU’s first CO2 standard for new passenger cars, official type-approval emissions decreased at a rate of about 3.5% per year, compared to about 1.2% prior to regulation. The 2015 target of 130 g/km was met well in advance by manufacturers.

Applying the ICCT Roadmap Model, three scenarios were modeled to assess the required level of type-approval CO2 emission reduction for new passenger cars and vans: Adopted policies: Average new car CO2 emissions decrease by 15% by 2025 and 37.5% by 2030, relative to 2021. For vans, the reduction is 15% by 2025 and 31% by 2030, relative to 2020.

Air pollution poses a risk to human health at levels even below the emission limits established by the World Health Organization in Europe.

The European Commission is currently developing the requirements for the upcoming Euro VII standards. This paper assesses the total manufacturing costs of the emissions control systems—including both engine and aftertreatment technologies—that will likely be required to meet these limits.

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