The report highlights the limitations of current emissions standards and provides detailed recommendations to overcome them. The recommendations cover several topics where the current light-duty vehicle emission standards should be strengthened.

This briefing provides an overview of CO2 emission levels of new passenger cars in the European Union in 2018 based on a preliminary dataset recently released by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The dataset showed that new cars sold in the EU in 2018 had average CO2 emissions of 121 g CO2/km, 2g/km higher than in 2017.

This paper analyzes the Turkish passenger car market and the effect of the existing tax system on both vehicles on the road and newly registered cars. It outlines the most recent developments in the Turkish passenger car market and creates a basis for further research on optimizing the tax system.

On December 17, 2018, representatives of the European Commission, the European Parliament, and the European Council agreed on a compromise for the European Union (EU) regulation setting binding carbon dioxide (CO2) emission targets for new passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles for 2025 and 2030.

Transport emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) have not decreased nearly as much as CO2 from all other sectors in Europe. Together with emission limits, taxes can help accelerate reductions by giving consumers incentives for buying low-emission vehicles, creating a market-pull effect.

The eco-innovations mechanism rewards innovative technologies that produce real-world CO2 savings beyond what is measured over the standardized test cycle during vehicle type approval.

The share of diesel vehicles among new car registrations in the EU decreased from a peak of 55% in 2011 to 49% in 2016. Recent data indicate that diesel shares continued to fall in 2017 and early 2018.

The origin of the EU vehicle CO2 regulation is by now a well-known story. European car manufacturers promised to voluntarily reduce average CO2 emissions of new cars to 140 g/km by 2008, starting in 1995, when average CO2 emissions were 186 g/km.

On November 8, 2017, the European Commission (EC) published its regulatory proposal for post-2020 carbon dioxide targets for new passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans). The proposed regulation would be the third set of mandatory vehicle CO2 performance standards in the European Union (EU).

New passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans) in the European Union are subject to mandatory carbon dioxide standards until 2020–2021. The European Commission, European Parliament, and EU member states are preparing to extend the light-duty vehicles’ CO2 regulation out to 2025–2030.

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