New passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans) in the European Union are subject to mandatory carbon dioxide standards until 2020–2021. The European Commission, European Parliament, and EU member states are preparing to extend the light-duty vehicles’ CO2 regulation out to 2025–2030.

Finds that for cars, the cost for meeting a 2025 target value of 70 g/km (as measured in the New European Driving Cycle - NEDC) is between 250 and 500 euros higher than would be the case in a footprint-based CO2 target system.

This document outlines the current procedure for the determination of fuel consumption, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, electric energy consumption, and electric range, specifically for PHEVs in Europe, highlights the most relevant changes expected with the introduction of the new Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP) and dis

Provides background information and a detailed overview of the RDE legislation, as well as a discussion of its strengths and areas for improvement. Two legislative packages are currently under development to complete implementation of the new real-driving emissions (RDE) test procedure for measuring vehicle emissions in Europe.

The European Commission is preparing to extend the European Union's CO2 emissions regulation for passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles out to 2025–2030.

Details how implementing well-tested policy measures can help drive forward the necessary innovations and could reduce the total CO2 emissions of the LDV fleet in Turkey by about 36% compared to a business-as-usual scenario.

This briefing paper summarizes and analyzes preliminary data for 2015 recently released by the European Environment Agency (EEA) on CO2 emissions from new passenger cars in the EU. The EEA data show that the mandatory emission reduction target set by the EU legislation for 2015 has been met on average.

This study investigates consumer incentives for electric vehicles (EVs), including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs), in the five largest EV markets in Europe: Germany, the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, and Norway.

This study compares official fuel consumption values measured in laboratories with the real-world performance of 20 popular vehicle models. All models claim significant improvements in fuel efficiency since 2009, with reductions in official fuel consumption values ranging from 8 to 30 percent.

In January 2016 the EU Parliament will evaluate the RDE proposal from the European Commission's Technical Committee on Motor Vehicles (TCMV). This brief notes five things that could strengthen the regulation.

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