The share of diesel vehicles among new car registrations in the EU decreased from a peak of 55% in 2011 to 49% in 2016. Recent data indicate that diesel shares continued to fall in 2017 and early 2018.

The origin of the EU vehicle CO2 regulation is by now a well-known story. European car manufacturers promised to voluntarily reduce average CO2 emissions of new cars to 140 g/km by 2008, starting in 1995, when average CO2 emissions were 186 g/km.

On November 8, 2017, the European Commission (EC) published its regulatory proposal for post-2020 carbon dioxide targets for new passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans). The proposed regulation would be the third set of mandatory vehicle CO2 performance standards in the European Union (EU).

New passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans) in the European Union are subject to mandatory carbon dioxide standards until 2020–2021. The European Commission, European Parliament, and EU member states are preparing to extend the light-duty vehicles’ CO2 regulation out to 2025–2030.

Finds that for cars, the cost for meeting a 2025 target value of 70 g/km (as measured in the New European Driving Cycle - NEDC) is between 250 and 500 euros higher than would be the case in a footprint-based CO2 target system.

This document outlines the current procedure for the determination of fuel consumption, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, electric energy consumption, and electric range, specifically for PHEVs in Europe, highlights the most relevant changes expected with the introduction of the new Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP) and dis

Provides background information and a detailed overview of the RDE legislation, as well as a discussion of its strengths and areas for improvement. Two legislative packages are currently under development to complete implementation of the new real-driving emissions (RDE) test procedure for measuring vehicle emissions in Europe.

The European Commission is preparing to extend the European Union's CO2 emissions regulation for passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles out to 2025–2030.

Details how implementing well-tested policy measures can help drive forward the necessary innovations and could reduce the total CO2 emissions of the LDV fleet in Turkey by about 36% compared to a business-as-usual scenario.

This briefing paper summarizes and analyzes preliminary data for 2015 recently released by the European Environment Agency (EEA) on CO2 emissions from new passenger cars in the EU. The EEA data show that the mandatory emission reduction target set by the EU legislation for 2015 has been met on average.

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