To meet upcoming mandatory fleet-average reductions in CO2, heavy-duty vehicle manufacturers will have to introduce fuel-efficient technologies at a faster rate than they have done in past decades.

The report highlights the limitations of current emissions standards and provides detailed recommendations to overcome them. The recommendations cover several topics where the current light-duty vehicle emission standards should be strengthened.

There is considerable interest in India in moving toward fuel-efficiency standards based on simulation modeling, and particularly in exploring the feasibility of using the Vehicle Energy Consumption Calculation Tool (VECTO) developed by the European Commission.

This paper summarizes and compares the two main test methods for aerodynamic evaluations of heavy trucks in the United States and the European Union: coastdown testing and constant-speed testing, respectively.

For this paper, the CO2 emissions levels of two versions of the Volkswagen Golf, one diesel (Golf TDI) and one gasoline (Golf TSI), were compared both in laboratory tests and in on-road measurements under real-world driving conditions.

For this study, a C-segment passenger vehicle, equipped with a gasoline direct injection engine and compliant with the Euro 6c standard, was tested on the chassis dynamometer over the regulatory NEDC and WLTC cycles, and over two RDE-like cycles. The tests were performed at different ambient conditions and with both cold and warm engines.

On February 19, 2019, representatives of the European Commission, the European Parliament, and the European Council agreed on a compromise for setting carbon dioxide (CO2) emission standards for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) for the first time in the European Union.

Heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) are currently responsible for about one-fourth of fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector in the European Union. Within the HDV sector in the EU, tractor-trailers represent the largest share of CO2, accounting for roughly 70% of emissions.

On May 17, 2018, the European Commission released a regulatory proposal for setting the first ever carbon dioxide (CO2) emission standards for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) sold in the European Union.

Heavy-duty vehicles in the European Union so far have not been subject to carbon dioxide emissions or fuel-consumption standards, making Europe the largest market without mandatory limits for such vehicles.

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