Reveals that the efforts made by multiple Transport Task Group (TTG) countries to promote and support policies and programs—including stringent tailpipe emissions standards, fuel economy standards, low sulfur fuels, and green freight programs—are in good alignment with the long-term perspective and pathways of the Transport Task Group defined in

Analyzes emerging vehicle-efficiency technologies with respect to cost and capacity to lower carbon emissions from passenger cars and light-duty trucks in the 2025–2030 time frame.

In 2014, the G20 Energy Efficiency Action Plan prioritized the establishment of a Transport Task Group (TTG) to promote cooperation among participating G20 countries to develop domestic policies that improve the energy efficiency and environmental performance of motor vehicles, particularly heavy-duty vehicles.

NOx emissions from diesel cars in the EU have remained high, largely due to a growing gap between emission certification limits of Euro 4 and Euro 5 standards (measured in laboratory testing) and “real-world” emissions of diesel cars operating on the roads.

Accelerated adoption of clean vehicle and fuel policies would save 25 million years of life cumulatively by 2030 and reduce early deaths by more than 210,000 lives in 2030 and the greatest single health gains would occur in China and India by preventing 90,000 early deaths, about 40 percent of the global total. Read more in this new report by ICCT.

This report evaluates the impact of transportation policies on worldwide oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the potential for the reduction of both out to 2030. Its analysis finds that policies adopted and formally announced since 2000 will dramatically reduce oil consumption and GHG emissions from the transportation sector.