The European Commission’s “Fit for 55,” regulatory proposals are intended to secure a European Union (EU) economy-wide greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction of at least 55% by 2030. One of the regulatory proposals adopted by the EC is to amend the mandatory CO2 emission targets for new passenger cars and light commercial vehicles (vans).

If the global transportation sector is to align with efforts supporting the best chance of achieving the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting global warming to below 2 °C, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from road transport in 2050 need to be dramatically lower than today’s levels.

This paper reviews recent developments in the European passenger car market and assesses the implications for the proposed post-2021 CO2 emissions targets.

This briefing paper provides an overview of CO2 emission levels of new passenger cars in the European Union in 2020 based on a preliminary dataset recently released by the European Environment Agency.

Using electric vehicles for carsharing can enhance the environmental benefits of such programs. This briefing details electric carsharing in Europe and North America and provides insights into charging infrastructure and best practices gleaned from successful carsharing programs.

This wide-ranging life-cycle assessment (LCA) examines the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of passenger cars, including SUVs. Performed separately and in depth for Europe, the United States, China, and India, the analysis captures the differences among those markets, which are home to about 70% of global new passenger car sales.

This is a global overview of all targets announced, as of June 2021, for phasing out of the sale or registration of new internal combustion engine (ICE) passenger cars. It includes details of each goal in a concluding table.

As part of the roadmap to achieve its climate-neutrality goal, the European Commission will come forward with a proposal for revised CO2 targets for new passenger cars and vans by the middle of 2021.

Electric vehicle sales are rising fast in Europe and a growing number of governments have set targets for phasing out new internal combustion vehicle sales. A fundamental input in deciding the feasibility of such policies is how quickly battery electric vehicles can reach price parity with their internal combustion counterparts.

The second phase of China’s Parallel Management Regulation for Corporate Average Fuel Consumption and New Energy Vehicle Credits began on January 1, 2021. The policy regulates how both corporate average fuel consumption (CAFC) credits and new energy vehicle (NEV) credits are calculated and traded.

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