Vehicle emissions control programs in China have made considerable progress, mainly attributed to the uptake of emissions control technologies driven by increasingly stringent standards and improved fuel quality. Nevertheless, challenges remain regarding compliance with emissions standards for vehicles under real-world driving conditions.

This report provides a comprehensive overview of vehicle remote sensing, an emissions measurement technique which has been used for more than 25 years to evaluate emissions from passing motor vehicles in real-world driving.

All car and van manufacturers met their carbon dioxide (CO2) specific emission targets in 2016, based on current European vehicle test rules, but they will need to continue their efforts to meet future agreed-to cuts.

On November 8, 2017, the European Commission (EC) published its regulatory proposal for post-2020 carbon dioxide targets for new passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans). The proposed regulation would be the third set of mandatory vehicle CO2 performance standards in the European Union (EU).

At the North American Leaders Summit (NALS) in June 2016, the heads of the governments of Canada, Mexico, and the United States agreed to “commit to reduce air pollutant emissions by aligning air pollutant emission standards for light- and heavy-duty vehicles and corresponding ultralow-sulfur fuel standards by 2018.” To support regulatory effort

Vehicle size and weight has evolved significantly in the last decades, with vehicle getting larger, taller and substantially heavier. The evidence gathered in this paper shows that the growing share of SUVs is drastically accelerating the size and weight increase trends and threatens the EU CO2 improvement rates.

The Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends Report is published annually to summarize trends in EPA’s best estimate of real-world tailpipe carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and fuel economy, and associated technologies.

EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) jointly established a National Program consisting of standards for light-duty vehicles that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and improve fuel economy.

This study examines how inversing the trend towards ever heavier light-duty vehicles would impact CO2 emissions from road transport. The average mass of passenger cars in the European Union has increased by around 40% over the past four decades. In 2015, a vehicle weighed on average 1 400 kg, compared to just under 1 000 kg in 1975.

Reveals that the efforts made by multiple Transport Task Group (TTG) countries to promote and support policies and programs—including stringent tailpipe emissions standards, fuel economy standards, low sulfur fuels, and green freight programs—are in good alignment with the long-term perspective and pathways of the Transport Task Group defined in