This briefing compares the fleet characteristics and fuel-efficiency technology deployment in China, Europe and the U.S. from 2010 to 2014. In addition, the briefing evaluates the response of the passenger vehicle market in China to the country’s fuel efficiency standards.

This analysis examines the potential of fuel-saving technologies for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) in India less than 12 tonnes over the next 10 years. This is a follow-up study to research that completed for the greater than 12-tonne segment.

The government's National Electric Mobility Mission Plan 2020 envisages achieving 6-7 million sales of hybrid and e-vehicles by 2020

The ICCT commissioned the Institute for Internal Combustion Engines and Thermodynamics of the Graz University of Technology (TU Graz) to conduct track and chassis dynamometer testing to determine the aerodynamic drag, pollutant emissions, and fuel consumption of three European heavy-duty vehicles.

The share of diesel vehicles among new car registrations in the EU decreased from a peak of 55% in 2011 to 49% in 2016. Recent data indicate that diesel shares continued to fall in 2017 and early 2018.

The 2018 Toyota Camry incorporates eight technology upgrades that are specifically modelled in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Optimization Model for Reducing Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Automobiles (OMEGA) and Lumped Parameter Model (LPM).

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently published the final Phase 2 rules targeting fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions attributable to new heavy-duty vehicles and engines.

This report assesses the economic costs and benefits of decarbonising passenger cars in Europe. A scenario approach has been developed to envisage various possible vehicle technology futures, and then economic modelling has been applied to assess impacts. The study follows a similar approach to that of the 2013 Fuelling Europe’s Future report.

All car and van manufacturers met their carbon dioxide (CO2) specific emission targets in 2016, based on current European vehicle test rules, but they will need to continue their efforts to meet future agreed-to cuts.

In the European Union, CO2 emissions from commercial vehicles grew much faster than from passenger vehicles from 1990 to 2014. Trucks and buses now produce about a quarter of CO2 emissions from road transport in the EU, and that share is growing as emissions from cars and vans decline further to meet increasingly tight CO2 standards.

Pages