This study examines how inversing the trend towards ever heavier light-duty vehicles would impact CO2 emissions from road transport. The average mass of passenger cars in the European Union has increased by around 40% over the past four decades. In 2015, a vehicle weighed on average 1 400 kg, compared to just under 1 000 kg in 1975.

New passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles (vans) in the European Union are subject to mandatory carbon dioxide standards until 2020–2021. The European Commission, European Parliament, and EU member states are preparing to extend the light-duty vehicles’ CO2 regulation out to 2025–2030.

Finds that for cars, the cost for meeting a 2025 target value of 70 g/km (as measured in the New European Driving Cycle - NEDC) is between 250 and 500 euros higher than would be the case in a footprint-based CO2 target system.

This briefing provides a synthesis of information regarding the global development of hydrogen fueling infrastructure to power fuel cell vehicles. The compilation includes research on hydrogen infrastructure deployment, fuel pathways, and planning based on developments in the prominent fuel cell vehicle growth markets around the world.

Assesses zero-emission heavy-duty vehicle technologies to support decarbonization of the freight sector in the 2025–2030 timeframe. Synthesizes data from the research literature, demonstrations, and low-volume commercial trucks regarding their potential to deliver freight with zero tailpipe emissions.

Analyzes the benefits of establishing separate engine CO2 standards in addition to full-vehicle regulations to specifically drive improvements in heavy-duty engine efficiency.

An international study, testing on-road emissions of passenger cars in India, says a diesel SUV may be emitting 25 to 65 times more oxides of nitrogen (NOx) than a small petrol car.

Heavy-duty vehicles produce about a quarter of all carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from road transport in the European Union (EU), and some 5% of the EU’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Their share is growing, as emissions from cars and vans decline in response to increasingly stringent CO2 standards for those vehicles.

The road freight sector is both a key enabler of economic activity and a key source of energy demand, in particular oil. Trucks rely almost exclusively on oil-based fuels. They are the second largest source of global oil demand, following passenger cars and at a similar level as the entire industry sector.

This paper reviews the political science, regulatory, and economics literature to illuminate the international competitiveness impacts of motor vehicle emission standards.

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