Poor air quality across Indian cities threatens the health of millions, and pollution levels have remained at dangerous levels throughout the last decade. To address the urban air quality crisis, officials have targeted motor vehicles, a major source of pollution in urban areas.

This report investigates the development of fuel consumption and other light-duty vehicle (LDV) characteristics (vehicle dimensions, weight, and technical parameters such as fuel type, engine power and displacement) for new vehicle registrations from 2005 to 2013 for more than 20 countries.

This working paper details the differences in fuel specifications for commercial gasoline and diesel fuels in India and the EU, and assesses potential air pollutant emission impacts of these differences.

India is in the process of developing fuel efficiency standards for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), and one of the most critical inputs to regulatory development is a technology potential analysis to determine the efficiency levels that the fleet can reasonably achieve over the duration of the regulation.

In January 2016 the EU Parliament will evaluate the RDE proposal from the European Commission's Technical Committee on Motor Vehicles (TCMV). This brief notes five things that could strengthen the regulation.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released a report that explores key trends in carbon dioxide emissions, fuel economy, and technology usage related to model year 1975 through 2015 light-duty vehicles sold in the United States.

Worldwide, the vehicle fleet is not making enough progress on fuel economy and is failing to reach global targets aimed at reducing CO2 emissions, cutting oil consumption and improving energy efficiency according to a new report from the Global Fuel Economy Initiative (GFEI) (earlier post) released at the Paris COP21 Climate Summit.

This paper investigates the potential for electric vehicles to contribute toward leading nations’ climate goals.

Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Labeling (VFEL) is used by numerous countries worldwide to improve the fuel efficiency of their transport fleets. The theory behind VFEL is that better-informed consumers are more likely to purchase fuel-efficient vehicles, and that market demand can improve the energy efficiency of the transport sector.

Intended Nationally-Determined Contributions (INDCs) represent a unique opportunity to increase bold mitigation and adaptation measures in transport and other sectors, as for the first time, countries are communicating their intended actions to reduce emissions and increase resilience on sectoral scales in the context of the UNFCCC system.The SL

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