The share of diesel vehicles among new car registrations in the EU decreased from a peak of 55% in 2011 to 49% in 2016. Recent data indicate that diesel shares continued to fall in 2017 and early 2018.

This policy update provides a summary of Canada’s proposed federal clean fuel standard (CFS) policy structure based on proposals and the framework document from Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), as well as discussion of the potential impacts of not addressing indirect land-use change (ILUC).

The CO2 certification procedures for HDVs in the EU and the United Stated use a combination of component testing and vehicle simulation to assign official CO2 emission and fuel consumption values.

This briefing paper reviews evidence on the environmental risks of growing lignocellulosic energy crops for biofuel production. The sustainability of energy crops such as Miscanthus, switchgrass, and short rotation poplar is a growing concern as the European Union (EU) considers ambitious targets for advanced biofuels.

This briefing provides a brief overview of the energy cost per mile for a vehicle using gasoline versus the energy cost per mile using electricity in the United States. It highlights the imperative to consider electricity costs for electric vehicles in the context of all competing gasoline alternatives including gasoline hybrids.

The Mexican government published final emissions standards for engines used in heavy-duty trucks and buses and complete heavy-duty vehicles, NOM-044-SEMARNAT-2017 on February 19, 2018.

The 2018 Toyota Camry incorporates eight technology upgrades that are specifically modelled in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Optimization Model for Reducing Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from Automobiles (OMEGA) and Lumped Parameter Model (LPM).

Vehicle emissions control programs in China have made considerable progress, mainly attributed to the uptake of emissions control technologies driven by increasingly stringent standards and improved fuel quality. Nevertheless, challenges remain regarding compliance with emissions standards for vehicles under real-world driving conditions.

The origin of the EU vehicle CO2 regulation is by now a well-known story. European car manufacturers promised to voluntarily reduce average CO2 emissions of new cars to 140 g/km by 2008, starting in 1995, when average CO2 emissions were 186 g/km.

This briefing reviews recent research regarding greenhouse gas emissions from the manufacturing of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles. Analyze this research in the overall context of life-cycle emissions of electric cars as compared to conventional internal combustion vehicles in Europe.