As Indonesia moves toward more advanced vehicle emission standards, lower sulfur limits in fuel, and palm biodiesel expansion, it is important to understand the impact that increasing palm biodiesel blending rates is likely to have on vehicle emissions.

The heating sector makes up 10% of the United Kingdom’s carbon footprint, and residential homes account for a majority of demand.

The heating sector makes up 10% of the United Kingdom’s carbon footprint, and residential homes account for a majority of demand.

Policymakers aiming to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from transportation fuels are interested in supporting fuels derived from wastes and residues to avoid the significant indirect land use change (ILUC) emissions associated with food-based biofuels.

While public awareness of indirect land-use change emissions from using food commodities for biofuels has grown over recent years, the indirect climate impacts of advanced biofuels made from by-products, wastes, and residues are less well understood.

India’s 2018 National Policy on Biofuels sets ambitious biofuel targets of 20% ethanol blending and 5% biodiesel blending, both by 2030, and aims to source these biofuels only from sustainable feedstocks that do not threaten food security.

Although recently published research addresses a range of issues relating to the corn ethanol lifecycle, much attention has focused on the result that corn ethanol production has a significantly better emissions profile than the U.S.

This working paper assesses the potential for Germany to meet the transport sector targets set by the European Union's recast Renewable Energy Directive (RED II) using advanced, non-food-based fuels.

Significant greenhouse gas savings are possible by transitioning from first-generation, food-based biofuels to advanced alternative, non-food based fuels.

Policies in the European Union, the United States, and Canada support the use of forest biomass in heating, power generation, and transportation as a climate mitigation strategy. However, research conflicts on whether forest bioenergy results in greenhouse gas (GHG) savings in the long-term.

Pages