Significant greenhouse gas savings are possible by transitioning from first-generation, food-based biofuels to advanced alternative, non-food based fuels.

Policies in the European Union, the United States, and Canada support the use of forest biomass in heating, power generation, and transportation as a climate mitigation strategy. However, research conflicts on whether forest bioenergy results in greenhouse gas (GHG) savings in the long-term.

This briefing paper discusses key terms related to gas in the context of energy policy and climate change mitigation goals in the European Union. It also proposes a method of categorizing gas sources based on their GHG emissions intensity and illustrates how these categories can be used to refer to gas from different sources.

This study presents the production potential for renewable methane in Belgium in 2050. Belgium is developing the domestic energy and gas infrastructure policies necessary to comply with the recast Renewable Energy Directive (RED II) and its Paris Agreement commitments.

This study presents the production potential for renewable methane in the Netherlands in 2050. The Netherlands is in the process of developing the domestic energy and gas infrastructure policies necessary to comply with both the recast Renewable Energy Directive (RED II) and the country’s Paris Agreement commitments.

Alternative jet fuels (AJFs) are among the few available in-sector approaches to reduce aviation sector emissions. Although the aviation sector has not played a prominent role in fuels policy to date, policymakers are increasingly incorporating aviation fuels into long-term strategies as the road sector is electrified.

Aviation is widely seen as the transport sector that is most difficult to decarbonize. One option to dramatically reduce emissions within the aviation sector is through the use of low-carbon alternative fuels.

The European Union (EU) will continue incentivizing the use of biofuels and other renewable fuels through its recast Renewable Energy Directive for 2021-2030 (RED II).

Indonesia has an ambitious 20% blending mandate for biodiesel in transport diesel fuel and relies almost entirely on palm oil to meet this target. This white paper assesses the potential of used cooking oil (UCO) as a biofuel feedstock in Indonesia.

This paper first reviews the effects of biodiesel on emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter in conventional vehicles. It compares the effects of using palm biodiesel and other biodiesel feedstocks, such as soy and rapeseed oils.

Pages