Although the majority of the on-road vehicle fleet in the United States is fueled by gasoline, diesel combustion makes up an overwhelming share of vehicle air pollution emissions. Air pollution emissions can be affected by blending biodiesel into diesel fuel.

Today, virtually all biodiesel in Indonesia is produced from palm oil. But as the government is seeking to increase biodiesel blending rates in the years ahead, this single feedstock might not be adequate to support those ambitions.

This study compares the cost of several low-greenhouse gas (GHG) or GHG-neutral residential heating technologies in the year 2050: (1) hydrogen boilers, (2) hydrogen fuel cells with an auxiliary hydrogen boiler for cold spells, (3) air-source heat pumps using renewable electricity, and (4) heat pumps with an auxiliary hydrogen boiler for cold sp

The European Union (EU) is considering ambitious alternative fuel policies to decarbonize aviation. However, it is critical that policymakers set realistic sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) deployment goals that match the amount of fuel that could be made from available feedstock.

This working paper provides background and analysis to help identify how an effective policy for alternative aviation fuels could distinguish among fuels that can deliver deep greenhouse (GHG) reductions and those that cannot.

This briefing paper reviews evidence of the impacts of the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) on food prices, with a focus on corn and soy, and presents new analysis on the impact of the RFS on U.S. livestock farmers. Studies examining the relationship between food prices and biofuel demand conclude that U.S.

As Indonesia moves toward more advanced vehicle emission standards, lower sulfur limits in fuel, and palm biodiesel expansion, it is important to understand the impact that increasing palm biodiesel blending rates is likely to have on vehicle emissions.

The heating sector makes up 10% of the United Kingdom’s carbon footprint, and residential homes account for a majority of demand.

The heating sector makes up 10% of the United Kingdom’s carbon footprint, and residential homes account for a majority of demand.

Policymakers aiming to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from transportation fuels are interested in supporting fuels derived from wastes and residues to avoid the significant indirect land use change (ILUC) emissions associated with food-based biofuels.

Pages