This report provides an overview of the CO2 emission levels of new passenger cars and light commercial vehicles (vans) in the European Union and Iceland in 2018 and manufacturers' performance towards their 2018 CO2 emission targets.

Four years on from the Dieselgate scandal - which exposed the failure to curb toxic air pollution from cars and shook confidence in EU emissions regulation - Europe is in the process of setting a new pollutant emissions standard for light and heavy duty vehicles.

Many energy consuming consumer durable goods, such as home appliances and vehicles, are subject to energy efficiency or greenhouse gas standards.

The new light-duty CO2 standards require the European Commission to monitor the real-world fuel and electric energy consumption of light-duty vehicles. In order to do this, the European Commission must develop a procedure to transfer the data recorded by soon to be mandatory on-board fuel and energy consumption monitoring devices (OBFCM).

This report provides a summary of CO2 emission levels of new passenger cars and vans in the European Union in 2017. It is based on data reported by Member States to the European Environment Agency (EEA) and verified by manufacturers.

On December 17, 2018, representatives of the European Commission, the European Parliament, and the European Council agreed on a compromise for the European Union (EU) regulation setting binding carbon dioxide (CO2) emission targets for new passenger cars and light-commercial vehicles for 2025 and 2030.

This report, which addresses the important step of “greening” the transportation system in South East Europe (SEE) countries. The main reason for establishing the SUMSEEC project is the exchange of experience between SEE cities, which often face common challenges, and opportunities.

Transport is Europe’s biggest source of carbon emissions, contributing 27% to the EU’s total CO2 emissions, with cars representing 45% of these. Transport is also the only sector in which emissions have grown since 1990, driving an increase in the EU’s overall emissions in 2017.

On May 17, 2018, the European Commission released a regulatory proposal for setting the first ever carbon dioxide (CO2) emission standards for new heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) sold in the European Union.

The European Commission proposed carbon dioxide (CO2) emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles. It is Europe’s first attempt at setting mandatory targets for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions from on-road freight vehicles, and a necessary step to meet the climate change mitigation objectives of the European Union.

Pages