The EU has adopted legislation, known as Horizon Europe, to shape EU Research & Innovation (R&I) spending for the 2021-2027 period. With a proposed budget of almost €100 bn, the programme aims to stimulate technological innovation and help the EU decarbonise.

Electric cars are about to go mainstream in Europe, and 2020/2021 is likely to be a tipping point for the market. Until recently, the EV market was limited to a niche of early adopters but tomorrow’s landscape will be very different as EVs enter a new phase and near the mass market.

A new climate ranking shows that EU governments’ plans to cut pollution from transport, Europe’s biggest emitter, will fail to meet their own 2030 emissions targets. Only the top 3, the Netherlands, the UK and Spain, scored above 50% in the ranking of draft national energy and climate plans compiled by Transport & Environment (T&E).

Electric vehicles can save France, Italy, Spain, and the UK between €500 million and €1.3 billion each a year as they switch to renewable energy, a new study has found.

This analysis shows that the final rules agreed on how zero and low-emission cars are counted towards the Cars C02 regulation – i.e. the multiplier for plug-in hybrids, double-counting in some markets as well as the potential inclusion of Norway – leave much room for gaming and loopholes.

A significant share of palm oil and soybean expansion happens on rainforests, forests, peatland and savannahs (land with high carbon stocks), according to a new study reviewing the latest scientific evidence on deforestation.

Transport is Europe's biggest climate problem accounting for 27% of its GHG emissions in 2017. Transport pollution is causing the illness and premature deaths of hundreds of thousands of Europeans. Meanwhile the EU spends over 200 billion a year importing oil to power its transport fleet.

Transport is Europe’s biggest source of carbon emissions, contributing 27% to the EU’s total CO2 emissions, with cars representing 45% of these. Transport is also the only sector in which emissions have grown since 1990, driving an increase in the EU’s overall emissions in 2017.

Fully electric buses only account for 9% of urban bus sales in Europe – despite being cost competitive with diesel buses when the costs of air pollution and noise are taken into account.

The EU has agreed to cut its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by at least 80-95% by 2050. Climate policy will require a shift away from petroleum which currently provides nearly all of transport’s energy needs.

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