Heavy-duty trucks are the main source of pollution and noise from urban freight. Electrifying these fleets brings substantial benefits to cities and the freight companies while advancing the transition to clean transport. Moving to electric fleets at an affordable price is possible today, if logistics operators understand the associated costs.

This paper summarizes the new vehicle sales market for Class 2 through Class 8 heavy-duty truck and buses in the United States and Canada. In addition, it profiles the early market for zero-emission HDVs and provides a snapshot of the battery-electric and hydrogen fuel cell products available across different truck and bus segments.

Millions of used cars, vans and minibuses exported from Europe, the United States and Japan to the developing world are of poor quality, contributing significantly to air pollution and hindering efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change, according to a new report by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP).

Trucks account for less than 2% of the vehicles on the road but 22% of CO2 emissions from road transport. The relative share of truck emissions is bound to increase as emissions from passenger cars are driven downwards by the surge in the sales of electric cars.

While heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) are just 5% of vehicle sales in China, they consume nearly 50% of all on-road transport fuel.

The European vehicle market statistics pocketbook offers a statistical portrait of passenger car and light commercial vehicle fleets in the European Union, updated annually. The emphasis is on vehicle technologies and emissions of greenhouse gases and other air pollutants.

Air pollution continues to be a major threat to public health. In 2017, 96% of the European Union’s urban population was exposed to ground ozone levels in excess of air quality guidelines (AQGs) from the World Health Organization (WHO). In the United States, the picture is similar. An estimated 93% of the U.S.

Regulators are working toward an India-specific version of the European Commission’s Vehicle Energy Consumption Calculation Tool (VECTO), and its use in future fuel efficiency regulations would allow India to implement simulation-based standards that are more aligned with trends in other major vehicle markets.

To meet upcoming mandatory fleet-average reductions in CO2, heavy-duty vehicle manufacturers will have to introduce fuel-efficient technologies at a faster rate than they have done in past decades.

There is considerable interest in India in moving toward fuel-efficiency standards based on simulation modeling, and particularly in exploring the feasibility of using the Vehicle Energy Consumption Calculation Tool (VECTO) developed by the European Commission.

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