This paper outlines design considerations for an effective low-carbon cement standard in the United States, including how to set benchmarks and stringency, how to address leakage and competitiveness, and how to structure cost containment policies.

Does unilateral climate change policy cause companies to shift the location of production, thereby creating carbon leakage? In this paper, analyse the effect of the European Union Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) on the geographical distribution of carbon emissions by multinational companies.

China’s emissions pathway during the coming decades is probably the single biggest factor in determining the achievability of the climate targets agreed in Paris. This fact is due to the still growing size of the Chinese economy and its carbon intensity, based on its reliance on coal to fuel the power system.

The EU cement sector has made progress to reduce emissions in the past three decades, yet there is a long way ahead for the carbon-intensive industry to decarbonise. In this study, potential decarbonisation pathways are developed and analysed based on different highly innovative technology routes.

To keep the window open to limit global warming to 1.5 C, countries need to accelerate transformation towards a net-zero emissions future across all sectors at a far faster pace than recent trends, according to this report from World Resources Institute and ClimateWorks Foundation, with input from Climate Action Tracker.

This report updates a working paper released last year, and details a global, transparent, and geographically allocated carbon dioxide (CO2) inventory for three years of commercial aviation. For the first time, we estimate absolute emissions and carbon intensity per passenger by both seating class and aircraft class.

This brief analyses four key sectors of the manufacturing industry: iron and steel, cement, ammonia and chemicals (primarily petrochemicals), which have the highest emissions intensity of production. The analysis reveals that the opportunities to decarbonise the manufacturing sector are aplenty.

Cities worked together to summarize the most relevant information and actionable findings related to the latest science on 1.5°C.

Carbon pricing is the most cost-effective policy to address the climate challenge. Following the Paris Agreement, a first acceleration in the implementation of carbon pricing schemes has been observed and can expect a further acceleration over the next few years, as countries ratchet up their climate goals under their Paris commitments.

Carbon capture, utilisation and storage will be an important part of the portfolio of technologies and measures needed to achieve climate and energy goals.

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