The introduction of the first generation of biofuels made from food crops has been controversial largely due to concerns over competition for land with food crops, thus raising global crop prices and generating induced land-use change (ILUC).

The Outlook for Energy is ExxonMobil’s view of energy demand and supply through 2040. A significant energy transition is underway, and many factors will shape the world’s energy future. These include government ambitions and policies that seek to promote prosperity while also addressing the risks of climate change.

South Asia is highly vulnerable to climate change. Given that many of the poor live in areas prone to climactic shifts and in occupations that are highly climate-sensitive, such as agriculture and fisheries, future climate change could have significant implications for living standards.

The effectiveness of national energy policy will be decisive for achieving the objectives of the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Australia has abundant energy resources. It is a leading exporter of coal, uranium and liquefied natural gas (LNG), much of which is destined for Asia’s growing markets.At home, Australia’s energy sector is undergoing a significant transformation.

Viet Nam has had rapid economic growth in recent years, but this growth has been energy dependent, even as the energy system has become more carbon intensive. This study uses a bottom-up model to evaluate 63 measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from household electricity, industry, power generation, and transport.

The Philippines currently has a low level of per capita greenhouse gas emissions. However, emission levels are growing at an increasing rate, with 4% annual growth between 2006 and 2012. The country’s energy

This paper explores ways of financing the transition from brown, carbon-intensive models of economic development to low-carbon, green economies. Countries are beginning to better understand their progress in transitioning from brown to green models of economic development.

In 2016, global GDP growth was 3.1% but emissions showed signs of stabilising, growing by only 0.4%. This means carbon intensity – emissions per dollar of GDP – fell by 2.6% in 2016. Carbon intensity has fallen at approximately this rate since 2014 - a clear step change from the historical rate.

Coal India is the world’s sixth-largest polluter amongst 250 biggest listed companies that account for for a third of all man-made greenhouse gas emissions according to this new study by Thomson Reuters

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