This report details a study on whether countries should use certified emission reductions – or CERs – to achieve post-2020 targets under the Paris Agreement. The Clean Development Mechanism is the world’s largest greenhouse gas crediting mechanism and will continue to issue CERs until 2020.

The Asian Development Bank (ADB), in a report launched, has proposed the creation of national green financing vehicles to catalyze environmentally and financially sustainable infrastructure investments in Asia and the Pacific.

This discussion paper estimates the potential supply of certified emission reductions (CERs) from projects registered under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) for the period 2013 to 2020.

The CDM has by now become an established mechanism for crediting climate friendly projects. Projects involving displacement or saving of grid electricity must calculate their emission reductions based on a grid emission factor which needs to be determined in accordance with the rules set by the CDM Executive Board.

This study forms part of a broader project, supported by the German Environment Agency (Umweltbundesamt, UBA), with the primary objective to analyse the current situation and development of the international carbon markets.

This paper examines how best to use revenues from a carbon tax to achieve both climate and non-climate goals, identifying pitfalls and strategies to avoid them. As many governments around the world consider carbon taxes (and other forms of carbon pricing), a common question is what to do with the revenue they generate.

We summarize reasons for mandating independent monitoring of greenhouse gas emission reduction projects. In support of our policy recommendations, we describe a case study of a program designed to earn carbon credits by distributing almost one million drinking water filters in rural Kenya to avert the use of fuel for boiling water. We compare results from an assessment conducted by our research team in the program area among households with pregnant women or caregivers in rural villages with low piped water access with the reported program monitoring data and discuss the implications.

This Policy Brief outlines the “identity crisis” in which voluntary carbon standards find themselves after the adoption of the Paris Agreement.

Countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean urgently need financial support to green their power sectors and thereby implement their national climate action plans under the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

The Paris Agreement includes Article 6 with several provisions, which allow for the use of the international carbon market. In this paper, Cooperative Approaches (CA, Art. 6.2-3) and the Mechanism for Sustainable Development and Mitigation (MSDM, Art.

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