Preliminary 2017 figures suggest a slight decrease in the number of road deaths. Fewer traffic fatalities than in 2016 were recorded in 20 of 29 countries of the International Road Traffic Data and Analysis Group (IRTAD*) for which 2017 fatality data are available.

This report examines how increasing automation of cars and trucks could affect road safety, and which security vulnerabilities will need to be addressed with the rise of self-driving vehicles. It applies the principles of the Safe System approach and relevance of Vision Zero for road safety to the wider discussion on vehicle automation.

This study examines how inversing the trend towards ever heavier light-duty vehicles would impact CO2 emissions from road transport. The average mass of passenger cars in the European Union has increased by around 40% over the past four decades. In 2015, a vehicle weighed on average 1 400 kg, compared to just under 1 000 kg in 1975.

Urban authorities face numerous challenges as they try to manage the access and mobility needs of their citizens. Some of these are related to uncertainty about how new services, technologies and emerging social trends affect citizens’ mobility choices.

The mobility projections in this Transport Outlook indicate that global passenger transport volumes in 2050 could be up to 2.5 times as large as in 2010, and freight volumes could grow by a factor of four. Emissions of CO2 grow more slowly because of increasing energy efficiency, but may nevertheless more than double.

The world’s population will reach 9 billion by 2050. Meeting their
transport demands will be challenging. As both population and
incomes rise, global passenger mobility and global freight transport
volumes may triple by 2050. The International Transport Forum’s

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) International Transport Forum (ITF) has published a discussion paper titled “Key Mobility Challenges in Indian Cities,” which identifies challenges in urban mobility in India under three sections: urbanization and transport; urban mobility challenges; and current policies and interventions.

This report provides a brief update of greenhouse gas emission trends from the transport sector and discusses the outcome of the United Nations Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change held in December 2009 in Copenhagen.

This document says that climate change poses two fundamental challenges for the transport sector: transport will have to significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and it will require investment in order to adapt to impacts of climate change.